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Proposed New GDR/DPM

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  • A/TEL
    replied
    Pic 1 is from NS Facebook Page of L.E. James Joyce crew

    Pic 2 received from a colleague.

    Click image for larger version

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    Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by A/TEL; 28 September 2019, 00:38.

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    I think the old O/G combats were quite a costly bit of kit, compared to SD No1. I do know that the introduction of DPM was a huge cost reduction, per soldier.

    Leave a comment:


  • Truck Driver
    replied
    Originally posted by na grohmiti View Post
    The idea of the FCA being issued just with number 1s was a straightforward thing. Originally there was no combat dress, just a combat jacket and trousers, these were worn instead of tunic and number 1 trousers. Closed top button and tie was still part of this uniform. The FCA had just changed from bullswool, to what was known at the time as "bumfreezer" tunic. Same pattern as bullswool, but of material closer to that found on current tunic. Pdf had the current pattern tunic. The FCA only got this pattern tunic, with maroon epaulettes, and a green beret so we would all know our place, in the early 80s. Most duties were done in a variation of number one dress. You'll find many action shots from the early 70s and 80s of people driving apc wearing shirt and tie. Only officers got a pullover issued. Various green wn purchase pullover were permitted, unofficially.Green overalls were provided for messy work. I have an old photo from a potential officer course in 1988 where the honour guard are all carrying 303 rifles, wearing green overalls over beige shirt. That's how it was up to the mid 80s. Working dress came in to give the pdf something between combats and number 1s for normal duties. The FCA only got this in 1992. I remember in the 80s nobody was allowed wear combats within certain barracks unless going to or from tactical training. Military police were quite enthusiastic about enforcing this rule.
    In summary we all got number ones because we weren't allowed wear anything else.
    My point was issuing everyone (Reservist wise) a set of combats would surely have been a cheaper option than a set of SD NO 1. Remember doing full TOETs for ranges wearing it. Remember another night trudging up to the barracks gate soaked to the b****cks because I was caught in a downpour walking up. Fkn ridiculous situation at the time. Our counterparts across the water - as far as I know - were issuing in the opposite manner at the time
    Last edited by Truck Driver; 27 September 2019, 21:53.

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  • DeV
    replied
    Originally posted by apod View Post
    The RN are issued one these for wear under the PCS "Lightweight Jacket".
    https://www.strikeforcesupplies.co.u...stock&id=20594
    Kinda like a Norgie but without the roll down collar.Longer at the back and with thumb holes. Similar to our old Arktis style Norgie shirt.
    Their dress regs also allow it to be worn without a jacket while working but the jacket must be close by for firefighting.

    I dunno was this option considered for our squids? Perhaps it was discounted because of its Polyester content?
    Possibly but how do RN justify it ?

    https://youtu.be/-axywwk89bk

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  • apod
    replied
    The RN are issued one these for wear under the PCS "Lightweight Jacket".
    https://www.strikeforcesupplies.co.u...stock&id=20594
    Kinda like a Norgie but without the roll down collar.Longer at the back and with thumb holes. Similar to our old Arktis style Norgie shirt.
    Their dress regs also allow it to be worn without a jacket while working but the jacket must be close by for firefighting.

    I dunno was this option considered for our squids? Perhaps it was discounted because of its Polyester content?

    Leave a comment:


  • na grohmiti
    replied
    The idea of the FCA being issued just with number 1s was a straightforward thing. Originally there was no combat dress, just a combat jacket and trousers, these were worn instead of tunic and number 1 trousers. Closed top button and tie was still part of this uniform. The FCA had just changed from bullswool, to what was known at the time as "bumfreezer" tunic. Same pattern as bullswool, but of material closer to that found on current tunic. Pdf had the current pattern tunic. The FCA only got this pattern tunic, with maroon epaulettes, and a green beret so we would all know our place, in the early 80s. Most duties were done in a variation of number one dress. You'll find many action shots from the early 70s and 80s of people driving apc wearing shirt and tie. Only officers got a pullover issued. Various green wn purchase pullover were permitted, unofficially.Green overalls were provided for messy work. I have an old photo from a potential officer course in 1988 where the honour guard are all carrying 303 rifles, wearing green overalls over beige shirt. That's how it was up to the mid 80s. Working dress came in to give the pdf something between combats and number 1s for normal duties. The FCA only got this in 1992. I remember in the 80s nobody was allowed wear combats within certain barracks unless going to or from tactical training. Military police were quite enthusiastic about enforcing this rule.
    In summary we all got number ones because we weren't allowed wear anything else.
    Last edited by na grohmiti; 27 September 2019, 14:13.

    Leave a comment:


  • Truck Driver
    replied
    Originally posted by ancientmariner View Post
    Whatever kit is supplied for shipboard use, you will find after time , the users will adapt the issue to suit -- working on deck, in the boats, on the bridge, in the engine room, off duty at meals, resting and watching TV or whatever. Jumpers were always popular under shirts so supply a light T version for warm environment and a sweatshirt version for low temperatures. Often civilian pieces got into the mix especially at night.
    V-neck one a good idea. When I joined the FCA first, and only SD NO 1 was issued (would love to know who the idiot was who thought that was a good idea, £££ wise), a Sgt in the unit had his old light green V-neck working dress jumper. Used to wear it under his tunic in colder weather (the v-neck was neatly concealed under the tunic lapels)

    Leave a comment:


  • DeV
    replied
    Originally posted by hptmurphy View Post
    What should have been on issue to all engaged in 'working ship',, ships husbandry and technical people was proper overalls, grand heading off to paint somewhere and your kit gets covered in paint.....overalls weren't on general issue, probably could be covered with one wear paper ones these days , but working dress to a person at sea is just that.... dress for working in.....and it needs to be kept clean and tidy even when working with messy stuff.
    Disliked in error

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    Originally posted by ancientmariner View Post
    Whatever kit is supplied for shipboard use, you will find after time , the users will adapt the issue to suit -- working on deck, in the boats, on the bridge, in the engine room, off duty at meals, resting and watching TV or whatever. Jumpers were always popular under shirts so supply a light T version for warm environment and a sweatshirt version for low temperatures. Often civilian pieces got into the mix especially at night.
    What should have been on issue to all engaged in 'working ship',, ships husbandry and technical people was proper overalls, grand heading off to paint somewhere and your kit gets covered in paint.....overalls weren't on general issue, probably could be covered with one wear paper ones these days , but working dress to a person at sea is just that.... dress for working in.....and it needs to be kept clean and tidy even when working with messy stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • ancientmariner
    replied
    Originally posted by DeV View Post
    And cheap and warmer
    Whatever kit is supplied for shipboard use, you will find after time , the users will adapt the issue to suit -- working on deck, in the boats, on the bridge, in the engine room, off duty at meals, resting and watching TV or whatever. Jumpers were always popular under shirts so supply a light T version for warm environment and a sweatshirt version for low temperatures. Often civilian pieces got into the mix especially at night.

    Leave a comment:


  • DeV
    replied
    Originally posted by Poiuyt View Post
    I liked the Pullover with DPMs - As Apod said, not very practical in inclement weather but I thought it looked well. I imagine the NS version would look good too.
    And cheap and warmer

    Leave a comment:


  • Poiuyt
    replied
    Originally posted by A/TEL View Post
    The jumper looks ridiculous with the new rig.
    I liked the Pullover with DPMs - As Apod said, not very practical in inclement weather but I thought it looked well. I imagine the NS version would look good too.

    Leave a comment:


  • DeV
    replied
    Originally posted by A/TEL View Post
    I agree completely, but the NS clothing committee don't...... The jumper looks ridiculous with the new rig.
    But it isn’t (new expensive pointless corporate image) DPM outer so how does that work?

    Originally posted by na grohmiti View Post
    As it did with the Dpm when the army got them, but they insisted on issuing until stocks were exhausted.
    You'll be back wearing the pullover under your shirt again, just like the good old days...
    I wonder how much the jumper costs compared to the Westlife jacket?

    Leave a comment:


  • apod
    replied
    Originally posted by A/TEL View Post
    I agree completely, but the NS clothing committee don't...... The jumper looks ridiculous with the new rig.
    I disagree(but I would).
    I have seen the pics of same and think it looks the same as when we had the Jumper.Much smarter than the Bk jacket IMHO,but less practical(no rain protection/pockets etc).
    My gripe would be the comfort of wearing a jumper over a shirt with UBAC style sleeve pockets.
    Why oh why have we gone down the "Bird with a wing down "look with just one UBAC pocket on both services new shirt I don't know.It looks mental and is hardly practical.

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  • na grohmiti
    replied
    As it did with the Dpm when the army got them, but they insisted on issuing until stocks were exhausted.
    You'll be back wearing the pullover under your shirt again, just like the good old days...

    Leave a comment:

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