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  • #31
    Is there any role for something this size in the NS, operated by shore lovers and Sluggies to allow the NS to concentrate in operating further offshore?
    Or would there be no meaningful benefit to the current PV fleet in only having to operate outside the effective range of these cutters?
    "It is a general popular error to imagine that loudest complainers for the public to be the most anxious for it's welfare" Edmund Burke

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    • #32
      Customs officers get a boost in the battle against drug-runners

      http://www.rte.ie/news/2004/0628/nat...46175,null,200
      Tom MacSweeney, Marine Correspondent, reports that Ireland's first purpose-built Customs vessel has taken up duty based in Cork

      edited
      Goldie fish
      Tim Horgan
      Last edited by Goldie fish; 24 March 2009, 06:42.


      Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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      • #33
        Re: New revenue Cutter

        Now that the Customs have there "Cutter" and the Garda have there inshore patrols boats, is it not time that the Navy purchased more than Fisheries patrol boats. Is it time that the Irish Navy started to look at larger craft?

        Aslo if the Revenue Cutter is not armed in any way, is this not going to drain Naval resources backing up a craft when/if firepower maybe requied in a "Drugs" boarding incident.

        It now seems that there are 3 independent authoraties with inshore going craft that are all tasked with the same job in one way or another.
        "Why am I using a new putter? Because the last one didn't float too well." -Craig Stadler

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        • #34
          It strikes me as unusual to see a Lt Commander at the helm of this vessel,a position he will hold for a year while customs are getting used to operating such a craft. The Gardai had no naval assistance with the Water unit,and the Customs NDT went it alone too....
          I would be inclined to conspire that if considered suitable,this type of craft could eventually replace the Peacocks in the CPV role. A Large number of such craft,based at strategic locations around the coast,(Bantry, Foynes, Galway, Rathmullen, Drogheda, Rosslare, Cork)
          ,could provide a REAL inshore capability,with pretty good seakeeping if the Officer on the report is to be believed...
          The small crews required would not eat into manpower too much,allowing the Other ships to concentrate on other tasks further out to sea.


          Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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          • #35
            http://www.rte.ie/radio1/evening/seascapes/24june.html

            FIRST NEW CUSTOMS CUTTER IN THE HISTORY OF THE STATE
            The Customs Service has commissioned the first new purpose-built offshore patrol vessel to fight drug-runners on the Irish coastline. The latest weapon in their battle against drug-running is a 22-metre vessel, built in Finland at a cost of €1.6m. It can carry a crew of six and for the first year of its operation, the Naval Service will provide training for the Customs maritime personnel. The Chairman of the Revenue Commissioners, Frank Daly, has stressed that there is no question of the Customs usurping the role of the Naval Service. "We have the closest of relations with them and this will continue, but in the modern situations in which we are dealing with the extensive drug-running that has taken place in recent years, we need more than the rigid inflatables which have been our sole marine resource until now. This is an island country and we must have the capability to respond to those who try to bring drugs into Ireland by sea." The Naval Service, Customs who are part of the Revenue Commissioners and Gardai form a joint task force which, in recent years, has succeeded in seizing millions of Euros worth of drugs during attempted landings by boat on the South-West coastline in particular. "We do not claim to have stopped every attempted importation, no security force in Europe could claim that, but we are at the edge of Europe and have a responsibility towards the EU as well as to defend Ireland against the drug-runners," said Frank Daly.


            Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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            • #36
              Yeah a half a dozen of them wouldn't go astray ! Yes base one in every fishing port and major port...Now find sufficent crews and maintaince facilities !

              to operate effectively ..every three boats requires one as spare and every boat requires three crews...Thats the hard and fast logistical rule. Now accomadation has to be found at a suitable position.

              This is getting into the realms of the aircorps providing SAR cover. Why not now up grade the role of the coast guard and allocate these peole the boats and the taskings. Delegate powers of stop and arrest ...hey presto functional coast guard that also have their own independent air wing .....and are not subject to the confines of military thinking.:D
              Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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              • #37
                Then the question would be asked.."do we need a Navy anyway?"


                Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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                • #38
                  Might be a better question to ask do we need a navy with the capability to perform a naval role.
                  .
                  .
                  .
                  With 50,000 men getting killed a week, who's going to miss a pigeon?

                  Guns don't kill people, bullets kill people.

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                  • #39
                    I refer you to the thread about New Naval ship..


                    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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                    • #40
                      the cutter was on this weeks nation wide max speed is 27 knots the captin claimed that this would not effect the navys operations in any way and they look foward to working with them.

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                      • #41
                        I have a question, is it unusual for that type of boat to have a boat ramp at the back or is it standard?

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by coffee
                          the cutter was on this weeks nation wide max speed is 27 knots the captin claimed that this would not effect the navys operations in any way and they look foward to working with them.
                          Em..If you had read the earlier part of the thread,you would see a link to nationwide....

                          The Boat ramp as you call it is a pretty new idea. I have my doubts about it,but for a craft of that size,it is probably more practical than using a Crane or davit. The HM Customs use a single point launch system similar to that mentioned in the thread about Eithnes Delta's. I think the Dept of marine fisheries boats have a similar setup.





                          Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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                          • #43
                            The navies role would be reinforced not depleted as we would now have a dedicated inshore search team reinforced by an offshore unit..one supplementing the other and the navy could now prioritise in their primary function ...fisheries protection although this too could do with a similar type vessel again to be supplemented in the offshore role by the navy.

                            We will always need a naval service and are bound by international law to the upkeep of such a force.
                            Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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                            • #44
                              Though it is mentioned that the Naval officer on the crew is a temporary arrangement,could this be a tactic of Naval HQ to keep all ships under their control? The new Jetty outside the Maritime college looks about the right size to hold this boat also. Perhaps the NS will run them the same way as the AC run the Garda Air support unit? Having an NS officer aboard removes the chance of the Customs trying to pull one over on the NS. In future NS will be aware of all drug operations,and able to provide assistance as required.

                              Quayside address by the Minister for Finance, Mr. Charlie McCreevy, T.D.

                              Lord Mayor, Ministers, Ministers of State, Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen, On my own behalf and on behalf of Noeleen, I am delighted to be here today for the naming and commissioning of the new Revenue Customs Cutter, Suirbhéir.
                              We had the opportunity to travel up from Cobh this morning with Minister of State, Noel Ahern, Chairman Frank Daly and the crew of this very impressive vessel. It was a smooth run which is more than could be said for some of the choppy waters I’ve encountered from time to time.
                              I would like to compliment Revenue on its foresight and vision in adding this important piece of infrastructure in its, and the nation’s fight against the scourge of drug trafficking.

                              The Government’s National Drugs Strategy for which my colleague Noel Ahern has particular responsibility is based on four pillars. The first of these, supply reduction, sets a target of significantly reducing the volume of illicit drugs available in Ireland, to arrest the dynamic of existing markets and to curtail new markets as they are identified.
                              This vessel and the operations that will be directed and undertaken by Revenue with this vessel represent an important strengthening of Revenue’s and the States capacity to carry forward the fight against the importation of drugs.

                              The Cutter ‘Suirbhéir’ provides the Customs Service with the ability to provide greater cover by way of patrolling the Irish coastline – which is also of course the EU external frontier. She will also ensure that the Customs Service has a highly visible presence in coastal areas and make it more accessible to the coastal and maritime communities who are important partners in the Customs Drugs Watch Programme.

                              The challenge for Revenue in the weeks, months and years ahead is to build on the opportunities and very much increased response capability that this vessel provides. Last week, Frank Daly presented Revenue’s Annual Report to me for 2003. That report provided a comprehensive summary of the significant work undertaken and results delivered by Revenue last year.
                              On the Customs front I noted for example that Revenue seized drugs worth €21 million and detained over half a million euro in suspect drug-related cash.

                              That achievement represents an important element of the multi agency input to delivering on the supply reduction commitments of the National Drugs Strategy. I trust that record of achievement will benefit significantly from this Governments investment in this vessel.

                              On an occasion of celebration such as today, it is worth remembering the context in which Revenue operations, such as those will be facilitated by this magnificent vessel behind us, are conducted.

                              Revenue through its Customs Service has serious responsibilities under the National Drug Strategy to exercise statutory controls at ports, airports and the coastline, including the seizure of controlled drugs and the apprehension of traffickers.

                              Revenue also has an important role in the protection of the external frontier of the European Union. Here, on the Atlantic frontier, this responsibility is shared with Spain, Portugal, France, Holland, Belgium, Denmark and the United Kingdom.

                              In fact the length of our coastline and our strategic location on an island on the western extremity of the Union singles Ireland out as an important link in the protection of the Atlantic frontier. We are adjacent to the northerly shipping lanes that pass through the Irish Sea and the west of Ireland from North Africa, West Africa and the Mediterranean.

                              We are situated on the western approaches to Europe for maritime traffic from the Caribbean and from North America, Central America and South America.

                              Today is the culmination of a co-operative approach by a range of Government Departments and agencies. I know that there are representatives here from many of these Departments and agencies including the Department of Defence, the Department of Communications, Marine and Natural Resources and the Naval Service. I commend all concerned for their work and co-operative endeavour.

                              Your work has been important, not just in bringing the Cutter Project to fruition today but also in ensuring that Ireland as a nation is well equipped and positioned to provide a robust and effective response to the reality of drug trafficking in the years ahead.

                              I note in particular Revenue’s public acknowledgement of the role and support of the Naval Service in the fight against drugs and I am delighted to endorse that on behalf of the Government.

                              I know that my colleague, Minister for Defence Michael Smith, is himself very supportive of the joint task force approach to drugs interdiction that sees Customs, the Gardaí, the Naval Service and indeed the Air Corps working together as a team and getting the results that good teamwork brings.



                              Finally I want to wish the crew of this vessel every success in their new assignment. You went through a rigorous selection process and I know that you bring a high level of dedication and professionalism to your new role. You are the successors to those who manned the Revenue Cutters in the 18th century and who were required to be “sober, active and bred to the sea” – I know you meet all those attributes – at least the last two – I can’t vouch for the first. I wish you and all who sail in the Revenue Customs Cutter Suirbhéir success and safe passage.

                              .


                              Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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                              • #45
                                Loadsa bollocks although Mc Greevys missus is a cracker !:D
                                Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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