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Naval Service denies its patrols prefer to pursue Irish vessels

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  • Bosco
    replied
    Cheers Goldie.
    Question, how much 20mm ammo would the Aisling carry?

    Leave a comment:

  • Goldie fish
    Tim Horgan

  • Goldie fish
    replied
    There were a couple of books written some years ago about the History of the NS. They detailed the event pretty well, though if you do a search, I think it was discussed here some time back.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bosco
    replied
    Murf where can someone read up on this sonia incident!
    Seeing as thats the year I was born I know nothing about it.

    Leave a comment:

  • Goldie fish
    Tim Horgan

  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Lead ballast I assume?

    Leave a comment:

  • hptmurphy
    Commander in Chief

  • hptmurphy
    replied
    the sonia sank on its trip home due toinclement weather and the amount of lead she had inside her...crew picked up by a box boat going to waterford.

    Leave a comment:

  • moggy
    Commander

  • moggy
    replied
    nice one, should be nice court case

    Leave a comment:

  • Lordinajamjar
    Aha: Death=Preconception

  • lordinajamjar
    replied
    The rest of the story.

    Originally posted by BBC NEWS
    Norway fish officials handed over
    Elektron


    Two Norwegian fisheries inspectors who were held against their will on a Russian trawler for five days have been handed over to Norwegian authorities.

    A Russian rescue ship delivered the two inspectors to a Norwegian vessel anchored in the Barents Sea.

    The incident started when the trawler, the Elektron, fled while the two men were inspecting it for suspected illegal fishing on Saturday.

    It was chased by Norwegian coastguards until it reached Russian waters.

    Norwegian authorities claim the Elektron had been using illegal fishing equipment which violated quota rules on fishing catches.

    Both Russian and Norwegian authorities say they aim to investigate the captain and crew of the trawler, which was led back to its home port of Murmansk.

    Lieutenant Colonel John Lien, of the Norwegian military's northern command, said the inspectors were handed over at approximately 0850 GMT on Thursday.

    "I can imagine that they are very happy to be back on board their own ship with their own colleagues," he said.

    Old dispute

    The trawler was stopped on Saturday in the Svalbard archipelago in the Arctic, in waters claimed by Norway.

    The boat was intercepted and told to go to Norway, but it unexpectedly changed its course towards Russia.

    Although both sides have sought to play down the incident, the BBC's Lars Bevanger, in Oslo, says it has rekindled an ongoing dispute between the two countries over fishing rights in the Barents Sea.

    Norway claims sovereignty over the waters where the Elektron was apprehended but Russia and other fishing nations disagree. They argue Norway has no right to detain foreign vessels in that area even if they are breaking fishing regulations.

    Norwegian forces have detained Russian vessels before, but the most dramatic event so far involved an Icelandic trawler in 1994 which was forced to stop when a Norwegian coastguard vessel fired live shots at it.

    Leave a comment:

  • hptmurphy
    Commander in Chief

  • hptmurphy
    replied
    Nope that got fired..when the cooks took there turn on the weapons..it was a bit like aships range practise...at sea with a moving target!

    Leave a comment:

  • FMolloy
    King Monkey

  • FMolloy
    replied
    Originally posted by hptmurphy
    fired everything but the kitchen sink at it!
    Galley sink?

    Leave a comment:

  • hptmurphy
    Commander in Chief

  • hptmurphy
    replied
    Read up on the Sonia incident from 1984...thast what the NS have done in the past...fired everything but the kitchen sink at it!

    Leave a comment:


  • DeV
    replied
    Well if it was Irish fisheries officers they would be a lot further away from Russia than Norway is.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:

  • moggy
    Commander

  • moggy
    replied
    Don't think the wing will make it out in 8- 10 hrs. How would they get out, unless another ns vessel shipped them out earlier?
    FMolloy
    King Monkey
    Last edited by FMolloy; 18 October 2005, 23:43.

    Leave a comment:


  • DeV
    replied
    Wing?

    Leave a comment:

  • moggy
    Commander

  • moggy
    replied
    a situation like this would be dealt with proberly armed boarding parties by ns vessels or if failed by the dail, it depends or what naval hq would decide.
    FMolloy
    King Monkey
    Last edited by FMolloy; 18 October 2005, 23:42.

    Leave a comment:

  • Lordinajamjar
    Aha: Death=Preconception

  • lordinajamjar
    replied
    Nobody answered my question.

    So what option does the Naval Service have in a situation like this one?

    Originally posted by Latest Update from BBC News
    Fleeing trawler heads for Russia

    The Elektron is expected to reach Russian waters in 10-15 hours

    Norwegian ships are chasing a Russian trawler across the Arctic Ocean after it fled an inspection with two fisheries inspectors on board.

    The Norwegian ships have been trying without success to stop the Russian vessel by snagging its propeller.

    The Russian boat, the Elektron, was intercepted by Norwegian inspectors on Saturday for suspected illegal fishing.

    It was told to go to Norway, but unexpectedly changed its course and headed for Russian waters instead.

    Norway has complained that it is getting little help from Russia to resolve the incident. The Elektron was stopped in the Svalbard archipelago in the Arctic, in waters claimed by Norway.

    Unusual situation

    On Tuesday, Russia said the situation would be resolved through diplomacy.

    It said its forces were waiting to intercept the ship when it entered their waters, when it would release the Norwegian inspectors and accompany the trawler to the Russian port of Murmansk.


    A Norwegian military spokesman told the AFP news agency that the Elektron was off the Norwegian and Russian coasts in international waters.

    "They're still not co-operating," John Espen said. "They are currently heading towards Russian waters."

    Mr Espen said the Norwegian navy had held back from intervening because of bad weather.

    He said Norway was not worried about the two inspectors, "but you have to admit that the situation is unusual".

    A spokesman for the trawler's owner, the Union of the Fish Industry of the North, told the Interfax news agency that he believed a conflict over fishing quotas was behind the incident.

    Norway and Russia have land and sea borders in the Arctic, and disputes over fishing rights have become increasngly common.

    Leave a comment:

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