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  • Irish Maritime Industry?

    OK, Last time I looked, Ireland(north and south) was an Island, with No bridge or tunnel attaching it to the rest of Europe.

    Why then Is the Irish Marine industry on the decline?

    Irish Ferries are in the process of sacking all their Irish Workers, and replacing them with Latvian Crew. This is only if the Trade unions lie down and let it the Management do whatever they want. The Government it seems, is apathetic. Currently all its ships are confined to port. Consequentially there are no Irish Flag ships operating the Irish Sea ferry route. This is a sad end for a company which cut its teeth dodging U-Boats during the Emergency(sometimes unsuccessfully).
    B&I line and Irish Continental line merged in the Late 80s to become Irish ferries, And Irish Continental line were the state owned relic of Irish Shipping, which for a time carried vast amounts of freight worldwide, under an Irish Flag. But in the 80s, the recession Government could not support the company, and in scenes being repeated this week, crews found themselves stranded on their ships in foreign ports.

    Currently, the last Commercial Shipping company with an Irish Flag are Tyrrells,of Arklow with their distinctive green Hulls and White superstructure. However they are being penalised by the irish Government, and taxed in a way which they believe is uncompetitive. Some of their vessels already fly foreign flags, though their crew for the most part remain Irish. Bell of Waterford went to the Wall long ago, while my former employer, Union transport, Moved their operation to Kent in the Late 80s, and currently fly flags which are unrecognisable to most. Emerald used to operate Refrigerated cargo under an irish Flag, but refrigerated Containerisation have for the most part rendered this mode of shipping obsolete, for all but the Odd Banana boat.

    All that is left on the Irish register are trawlers, and EU regulations mean that they too are an ever diminishing number.

    But it must be asked. As an Island nation, how do we expect to get on or off the Island, if our airports are overcrowded? How do we expect to continue to import and export goods, to keep industry here alive, and food on our tables that is not potatoes and bacon?

    Bertie recently proudly announced that Dublin did not need large trucks driving through the city. Has he the top secret design for a teleporter which will miraculously beam foreign produce from the factories overseas to the shelves of the many shops in the city centre?

    Irish Martime Industry.
    1922-2006 RIP?


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

  • #2
    Agree with you re government policy on Irish ships.

    There is no policy... let the market decide.....

    Not too many votes there either... Joe/Josephine public don't give a shit how produce gets on the shelves ... once it gets there.

    As an Island we need our own flagged/owned/crew ships,we got screwed in 1939/45 because we had no ships but politicians pander to public opinion and the the great majority of the public were not around in 1935/45

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    • #3
      you can't buck the market.

      how are irish ferries supposed to compete with ryanair etc if they have to pay above bottom dollar for what is generally (no offence) pretty unskilled labour? [ Edit: I Take that back - I guess running/sailing a ship is complicated enough.]

      look at rover etc - you can either let the market take it's course, or you can have strikes and demonstrations to try and prop up an unsustainable state of affairs.

      if there is a strategic advantage in having irish staff on ferry routes out of dublin, let the government quantify it and pay for it, otherwise let the market take its course.
      silverside
      Corporal
      Last edited by silverside; 10 December 2005, 10:39.

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      • #4
        On the contrary Silverside, Irish ferries are getting rid of irish skilled workers and replacing them with foreign (lower paid)skilled workers.
        Cheaper staff is not the answer. Ryanair have yet to carry cars or trucks to the UK. Stena and Brittany ferries seem to be doing fine with Locally sourced crews, how is it that Irish Ferries cannot?


        Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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        • #5
          Are these numbers not accurate then?


          Merchant marine:
          total: 39
          by type: bulk carrier 4, cargo 27, chemical tanker 1, container 1, passenger/cargo 4, roll on/roll off 2
          foreign-owned: 11 (Germany 3, Italy 3, Norway 1, Switzerland 1, United Kingdom 3)
          registered in other countries: 18 (2005)

          "When you arise in the morning, think of what a precious privilege it is to be alive - to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love."


          Marcus Aurelius Roman Emperor (161 to 180 A.D.)

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          • #6
            well given that the employees are actually in contravention to a piracy act.......

            Sorry what was the question.....?
            Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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            • #7
              So the crew are pirates now eh?!?
              What are you cackling at, fatty? Too much pie, that's your problem.

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              • #8
                As distinct from the Company....


                Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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                • #9
                  the government does not give a .... Look at irish shipping years ago???

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                  • #10
                    Goldie, just a quick question. What exactly is the maritime industry?

                    Are we talking about ship building, shipping, fishing or international trucking? Because they are all, in fact, in entirely different sectors of the economy, the fact that they all involve the sea does not make them one industry.

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                    • #11
                      I'd say for the purposes of this thread - the Irish maritime industry is what is know as shipping industry (as in containers, bulk, ferries, etc).

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                      • #12
                        Movement of freight by sea.


                        Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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                        • #13
                          Why is it important that vessels operate under an Irish flag? So long as the state has access to reasonably priced tranport links, operating to a good quality of timeliness and safety, who cares who provides the service?

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                          • #14
                            Safety standards, cargo integrity, for starters. Other flag carriers do not adhere to the same standards. Would you be satisfied getting your grain from some obscure flag vessel when you knew these ships were also involved in the trafficing of people, drugs and weapons?
                            Why, as an Island do we need to rely on vessels of other nations to provide us with all our imports?

                            Flags on vessels are always associated with quality of service. Some flags do not inspire the same quality of service that the Tricolour or red ensign would. Some flags also draw the attention of International inspectors. How can you trade when your products are sitting in the hold of a vessel which has been arrested for infringement of some IMO regulation(International Maritime organisation).


                            Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Flags are associated? By who? Shipping companies compete. If they can't, they go out of business. Simple as that. Where is the role of the state in 'supporting' shipping if there are operators who are able to do the job, to standard and profitably?

                              There are health and safety regulations on the transport of grain for example, and the EU are quite strict on who is allowed to transport it. Thats where the licensing regime comes into play.

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