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Drydocking?

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  • hedgehog
    replied
    any pics

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Who do you think does the maintenance work while she is in drydock? Dockyard staff do the engineering bit, but the housekeeping is all Naval.

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  • The real Jack
    replied
    How would the ship need a crew if it was in drydock?

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  • ELVIS
    replied
    dublin could never realistically be used unless a naval base is constructed there. If a ship is in drydock there, how do the crew get to work everyday?

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    L.E. Aoife is in Drydock at Rushbrooke at the moment. Interesting to see her out of the water if you haven't seen it before.

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Wait a while...let them think I have all this stuff in my head.



    The Information comes from a Fine book, property of one HPT Murphy.
    The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea, which has the answer to all those nautical questions you always wondered about.

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    Now Goldie tell the boys and girls where you got the information from!

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  • WES
    replied
    Originally posted by Goldie fish
    Ok...Listen carefully...
    To "Grave" a ship in times of wooden hulls was to insert a new piece of timber,known as a graving piece, in Place of Timber which has rotted in the hull of a wooden vessel.

    From that we get graving dock, which is a permanent dock with walls usually constructed of stone or concrete and sealed in the normal way with a "caisson". The term originated from the old practice of Graving, or Beaming a ships bottom. Today a Graving dock is synonymous with "dry dock".
    Good one, Goldie

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Ok...Listen carefully...
    To "Grave" a ship in times of wooden hulls was to insert a new piece of timber,known as a graving piece, in Place of Timber which has rotted in the hull of a wooden vessel.

    From that we get graving dock, which is a permanent dock with walls usually constructed of stone or concrete and sealed in the normal way with a "caisson". The term originated from the old practice of Graving, or Beaming a ships bottom. Today a Graving dock is synonymous with "dry dock".

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  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Hi Goldie
    What does "graving" mean?
    regards
    GttC

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  • Viking
    replied
    Cheers.

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Verolme Cork Dockyard closed as a shipbuilding facility immediately following the construction there of L.E Eithne. However under different management and ownership, some Engineering and Ship repair work is carried out there.

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  • Viking
    replied
    Pardon my ignorance, but was Cork Dockyard not shut in the early 1990s? Also known as Verolme? Presumably there is something of it left?

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    Remember seeing afloating dock for sale somewhere recently...an option perhaps?

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  • Stoker
    replied
    Originally posted by Goldie fish
    How big are the Drydocks in Dublin?

    As an aside, What would it take to get the Graving dock in Haulbowline operational? It is similar in size to that in Cork Dockyard..

    The drydock in Dublin is over 200M long. We will never have a vessel so long that it would not fit in the graving dock in Rushbrook let alone Dublin, ( Emer is 65.2M LOA ).

    It would make no sense to spend money on the disused dock in Haulbowline, Dublin and Rushbrooke are underused as it is, besides it would cost millions,new pumps,switch boards, electrical supply, transformers, valves and caissons are needed,the sill would need to be rebuilt as it would no longer provied a watertight seal, besides the capitol cost there would be a cost of tens of thousands just to operate and maintain it.
    I think there are better ways to spend money like more bertage and crainage,you can never have enough of these!

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