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  • Norway is one European country with a marine department, they call it the Ministry of Fisheries and Coastal Affairs. See website below:

    http://www.regjeringen.no/en.html?id=4

    Norway takes its marine sector seriously, particularly as the sector is worth up to 20% of GDP. The value of the marine sector to the economy is one of the reasons why Norway has stayed outside the European Union.

    Most other European countries are like Ireland with no importance being placed on the marine.

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    • Originally posted by Aidan View Post
      wh

      I've a challenge for you - name one European country with a Department of the Marine?

      Ours existed from 1987 to 2002, and was solely a gimmick.
      Do you not think a coordinated approach to the maritime sector would be an advantage? At the moment we have numerous different departments, dispersed all over the country, sharing responsibility, but none giving priority.
      Transport
      Agriculture & Fisheries
      Communications Energy and Natural Resources


      Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

      Comment


      • You might as well have a 'Department of the Air', covering air quality, broadcasting, birds and air transport. And a Department of the Ground, covering farming, roads, environmental protection ...

        A sectoral approach is much more productive - and useful. Marine transport and ports belong in the Department of Transport because the policy area the same. Sticking it in the same Dept as handles Fisheries just because it involves boats is quite a bit silly - the policy areas are very different and have practically no linkages. The creation of the DMNR by Haughey was a political stunt designed solely for self aggrandisment among his yachty friends.

        On the subject matter, I agree completely - the dockyard at Verolme is a national asset. But as you well know, there is relatively little the State can do to intervene if the private sector wants to use the land for something else. I wouldn't be so sure that the land will go for development immediately though - the IFI site has been vacant for a few years, and there's no immediate sign of movement.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Aidan View Post
          You might as well have a 'Department of the Air', covering air quality, broadcasting, birds and air transport. And a Department of the Ground, covering farming, roads, environmental protection ...
          Isn't there already a Govt Department that deals exclusively with aviation? The IAA? Why not have a similar Maritime Govt Dept?


          Originally posted by Aidan View Post
          On the subject matter, I agree completely - the dockyard at Verolme is a national asset. But as you well know, there is relatively little the State can do to intervene if the private sector wants to use the land for something else. I wouldn't be so sure that the land will go for development immediately though - the IFI site has been vacant for a few years, and there's no immediate sign of movement.

          The IFI site is technically not empty. There is a small Adhesives company operating there. There was hope that the Port of cork might move to Marino Point for its downstream operation, but for whatever reason, they declined, instead opting for the Supercontainer port in Ringaskiddy.


          Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

          Comment


          • The Dept of Transport deals with aviation, The IAA is a state body under the Dept of Transport
            It was the year of fire...the year of destruction...the year we took back what was ours.
            It was the year of rebirth...the year of great sadness...the year of pain...and the year of joy.
            It was a new age...It was the end of history.
            It was the year everything changed.

            Comment


            • Do you not think it's plausable? At the moment there is no specific government body that deals with Port State control, or the implementation of ISPS, SOLAS, MARPOL etc.
              Considering all the other testing functions of the dept of transport seems to have been contracted out.


              Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

              Comment


              • More to the point, the Dept of Transport has an entire Aviation policy area, under the auspices of an Asst Sec, exactly the same status as the Maritime Transport area.

                The only reason the IAA exists in the first place is to have an independent Aviation safety Authority to work with other such bodies internationally. It does not have a developmental or policy role. It does not have all of the safety functions either - the AAIU is based in the Department of Transport, afer all.

                Ownership of the Port Companies and the development of national policy with regard to these is a very different issue to the implementation of safety programmes. I'm not sure there's a need for a dedicated maritime safety agency here - most of this stuff is a matter for the Marine Safety Division.

                There are other plans in the offing for Marino point also, but nothing firm.

                Comment


                • Speaking of the Dry Dock in Rushbrooke

                  http://www.slv.vic.gov.au/brodie/0/0...bs003058.shtml


                  Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                  Comment


                  • Would a PV go into drydock for the annual refit or just for the scheduled drydocking?

                    If refit does it depend on the work bring done?

                    Comment


                    • How long is a piece of string?
                      Ideally, you do your refit when the ship is in drydock. I don't think refits are annual as such. It depends what needs to be done. Often, refits can be done alongside in the Basin, if no work beneath the waterline is required. The advantage of using the drydock in the past was its crane. However the large cranes were scrapped some years ago and Cork Dockyard now only has a Crawler construction crane. Meanwhile the Basin has a number of cranes with similar lifting capacity.


                      Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                      Comment


                      • The NS has annual refits and drydocks every 30 months.

                        Cheers ears

                        Comment


                        • Annual refits every 30 months?


                          Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                          Comment


                          • Refit annually and drydock every 30 months, I was trying to work out if it would be worth reopening the drydock on the island, but for 8 vessels for 2 weeks every 30 months?

                            Comment


                            • If you open it up, you'll soon find work for it.
                              All that is required is to rebuild the damaged caisson and pumphouse.

                              However if you are going to the trouble, may as well put a roof over it too to ensure work can continue in foul weather.

                              Oh and a Gantry crane too, SWL 20 tonne minimum.

                              Actually, drydocks are old news, and time and space intensive. Shiplifts are the current method of choice. In and up, then roll her to one side in case you need the lift for another ship.



                              Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
                                If you open it up, you'll soon find work for it.
                                All that is required is to rebuild the damaged caisson and pumphouse.

                                However if you are going to the trouble, may as well put a roof over it too to ensure work can continue in foul weather.

                                Oh and a Gantry crane too, SWL 20 tonne minimum.

                                Actually, drydocks are old news, and time and space intensive. Shiplifts are the current method of choice. In and up, then roll her to one side in case you need the lift for another ship.

                                Would the NS have the personnel to work on other vessels or be allowed to give access to equipment to others?

                                I assume that the drydocking is done as normal but the work takes place on the quayside or are the supports placed by divers?

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