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  • Dogwatch
    replied
    HMS Severn says goodbye to Barbados

    7/6/2015

    HMS SEVERN has ended her eight month deployment to the Caribbean on an Atlantic Tasking Patrol (North) mission.

    Before departing Barbados recently, Captain Lieutenant Commander Steve Banfield revealed that the British Warship visited 20 countries – making 28 port visits.

    He explained to members of the media that the over 234 day period in the Caribbean provided reassurance that Her Majesty’s Government is engaged in the region.

    During that time, counter - narcotic operations were conducted though the central and eastern Caribbean, working alongside a number of maritime enforcement agencies, as well as training an estimated 600 members of such agencies.

    “We recently completed Exercise Trade Winds 2015 with 14 countries centred on disaster relief, and countering transnational crime at sea. Everywhere we visited we conducted training with the local coast guards – quite a lot with Barbados’ Coast Guard, hosting senior Engineering ratings and Officers on board to discuss engineering management practices.”

    “The people who come on board learn from us about how the Royal Navy operates at sea. However, I also learn from them because the Caribbean is a region which at first I was not very familiar with. Having spent time with the region’s coast guards I learned how things work in the Caribbean, therefore when I am out doing counter narcotics operations I can determine when something doesn’t look right because it is not what normal behaviour is,” he pointed out.

    Captain Banfield took the opportunity to commend the efforts of the Regional Security System (RSS), expressing that he was impressed with the level of interaction between all the islands.

    “I have been massively impressed with how joined up the efforts are at sea in terms of keeping everybody safe, but also the counter narcotics and sharing of intelligence – a lot of it based around the Regional Security System,” he observed.

    “A lot of narcotics, especially in the eastern Caribbean are being intercepted at the moment… I went in their new aircraft recently and there is excellent equipment on board; a real asset. Also they were up spotting for us while we are looking for drug runners or illegal fisherman.”
    The Captain further revealed that HMS SEVERN will have steamed over 30,000 nautical miles by the time she returns to the United Kingdom, and held 91 official functions on board including capability demonstrations, lunches and tours. It is estimated that over 4,000 people would have visited the ship during the deployment.

    While on its final visit to Barbados, the Ship continued to have visitors, including 11 children from the Irving Wilson School, one of the British High Commission’s charitable benefactors on the island.

    http://www.barbadosadvocate.com/news...l&NewsID=44401

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  • Dogwatch
    replied
    Royal Navy Ship Pays Visit to Turks and Caicos



    The Royal Navy patrol ship HMS Severn has visited the Turks and Caicos to strengthen bonds with the Caribbean Islands.

    Severn, currently deployed in the region, arrived off Providenciales where her Commanding Officer Lieutenant Commander Steven Banfield met with local authorities and toured the Providenciales coastal radar station.

    The River Class Offshore Patrol ship then travelled on to Grand Turk, where she embarked the Acting Governor Mrs Anya Williams; the Premier Doctor Rufus Ewing and a number of other officials for lunch at sea.

    At the same time the ship also conducted a joint training exercise with the T&C Police Force (Marine) Division that simulated the process of identifying and investigating a vessel fishing illegally.

    Lieutenant Ollie Hazeldine, Severn’s Tactical Fisheries Officer who helped coordinate the exercise said: “Working with the Turks and Caicos Police (Marine) department and DEMA was an informative and valuable exercise for all parties.

    The Portsmouth based, and Newport affiliated, River Class Offshore Patrol Vessel has deployed to the Caribbean on Atlantic Patrol Tasking (North) duties, providing reassurance to British Overseas Territories and dependencies, whilst also being prepared to conduct disaster relief assistance.

    http://navaltoday.com/2015/01/15/roy...ks-and-caicos/

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  • DeV
    replied
    In fairness, the knocking it over the side thing makes sense 4 -v- up to 85

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    Not forgetting the Silverman to save the ship (or was he on the flight deck to pull the flight crew out
    Bit of anomaly in that one, at the time I was taught when I wore the suit, we got to pull the crew out, but the doctrine was if the helo caught fire use the monitors to knock it over the side and prevent damage to the ship...often wonder were the AC aware of our intentions?

    In the one incident I was involved in the Aircrafts own extinguishers had suppressed the fire before I got to dump 20kgs of dry powder into the engine involved, bet the engineers were well happy about that.

    My latter training in the CAA fire school taught that 'snatch' rescues using silvers suits very verboten ....and were strictly used by military only.

    I reckon the helo was going over the side only because the rescue divers wanted the practise...which brings me nicely to those people who qualified with the RN, dropping from Helos etc, a member here being one....cue Damo!!!!

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  • jack nastyface
    replied
    Originally posted by hptmurphy View Post
    Blue man magic......Deck crew wore blue vest with blue helmets


    White man does the bats....White overalls/yellow vest with yellow helmet( Red HH suit worn in case it went pear shaped and someone went over the side

    Red man does the fuel! Red vest with Red Helmet

    Guys in red HH suits they drove the boat that carried the diver that pulled the crew from the helo when it hit the water.
    Bit lumpy that day Murph. No flying, Bold Sir H getting sick in the wardroom...

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  • DeV
    replied
    Originally posted by hptmurphy View Post
    Blue man magic......Deck crew wore blue vest with blue helmets


    White man does the bats....White overalls/yellow vest with yellow helmet( Red HH suit worn in case it went pear shaped and someone went over the side

    Red man does the fuel! Red vest with Red Helmet

    Guys in red HH suits they drove the boat that carried the diver that pulled the crew from the helo when it hit the water.
    Not forgetting the Silverman to save the ship (or was he on the flight deck to pull the flight crew out?

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    What sort of wind state will will deck / ground the UAV? At what stage does it become U/S?
    Again it will be specific to the model used...and I reckon thats not going to be published for OPSEC reasons.

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  • FMP
    replied
    Originally posted by hptmurphy View Post
    One picture says a thousand words.

    Anyway I'm letting this one go enough has been said, it ain't going to happen with Aw139s or P60s.....
    I agree with you Murph. It wont. And I don't want it too. 51's and 61's are PERFECT the way they are, maybe with the EPV things will change but thats what if's and maybe's.

    But that's not what I'm asking!!! Its the relationship between high winds, UAV's and Helis. UAV's that will operate off NS vessels and the supporting Helis (AC / CG) that will work off land. Just the UAV's if it makes life easier, forget the helis. What sort of wind state will will deck / ground the UAV? At what stage does it become U/S?

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  • FMP
    replied
    Rainbow men magic would probably be more appropriate so .

    Too much time in Africa, it's all white man magic .

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    why do you keep showing me pictures of helis on ships etc
    One picture says a thousand words.

    Anyway I'm letting this one go enough has been said, it ain't going to happen with Aw139s or P60s.....

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    White man magic!
    Blue man magic......Deck crew wore blue vest with blue helmets


    White man does the bats....White overalls/yellow vest with yellow helmet( Red HH suit worn in case it went pear shaped and someone went over the side

    Red man does the fuel! Red vest with Red Helmet

    Guys in red HH suits they drove the boat that carried the diver that pulled the crew from the helo when it hit the water.

    Leave a comment:


  • FMP
    replied
    Right re-post time. Its not a difficult one gents so why are we all talking about harpoons and turning into the wind, why do you keep showing me pictures of helis on ships etc. and telling me I don't understand harpoons and bearclaws.

    Perhaps a bit of clearing up. Maybe its my bad English.

    There are no ships in the NS that can land helis. Correct?

    The NS will be using UAV's. Correct?

    The AC and the CG have helis. Correct?

    There will possibly be joint NS, AC, CG op's in the future. SAR for instance. Correct?

    Decked / grounded = not able to fly, or not able to operate. Decked in the UAV's case because it will work of a ship, grounded in the helis case because it will work off land. However I personaly use the phrase "Decked" in all dealings with aircraft so hope it does not cause a bit of confusion .

    Murph thank you for the comments. However that is not what I asked. I asked by way of doing a comparison, what wind conditions would have to be present before a heli would be decked / grounded verses a UAV being decked / grounded? Their inability to fly. Which asset would have to go back in its box first? Its a simple enough question. A specific enough question. Which asset do you lose first due to wind conditions.

    Lick your finger, stick it in the air and "Na, too windy, put it back in the box".

    Its in relation to various comments about assets not being available due to the weather. It got me thinking? Surely a UAV asset would be more susceptible to wind conditions compared to an asset like a Heli. Be they land or ship based. The NS does not have ship based helis. That is a fact. It is going to use ship based UAV's for surveillance etc. That is a fact. So in SAR mode it's the CG helis that will be out and about doing their bit and the NS UAV up and about doing its bit. Wind picks up,,,,,which one goes home first? Limitations on kit and therefore operations in various conditions when your putting all the kit / eggs in one basket, that's what I'm thinking about.

    Not pitching and rolling Murph because we don't have any ship based helis or ships that can work with Helis so that side of things is irrelevant. For the time being. Until the EPV arrives, god willing.

    I am more than aware of sea states and how it effects the thing your trying to land on, fully aware of turning into the wind, understand pitch and roll and have done for 25 odd years. And lots and lots of other things related to land, sea and air operations. An expert, NO! Not even close. Experienced, YES. Done it all, NO. Still at it, YES.

    So in the last 24 hours I have been accused of Ranting. Trooling. Being out of my depth. Dismissive. Being crankey. Anything else I have missed? If you don't get my point or understand the question, do the grown up thing and ask me to rephrase / repeat in slow time. Leave the name calling for the playground shall we.

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  • FMP
    replied
    Originally posted by hptmurphy View Post
    Yup.


    Even with all the ties downs, chocks etc... the harpoon is the primary locking mechanism.
    White man magic!

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    Harpoon is in use there, based on the signals the man with the bats is giving. What do you recon Murph?
    Yup.


    Even with all the ties downs, chocks etc... the harpoon is the primary locking mechanism.
    Last edited by hptmurphy; 8 December 2014, 09:02.

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    what wind conditions would have to be present before a heli would be decked
    Read it again, the ships can turn into wind reducing that crosswind component that would effect a helo, you are now looking at a specific wind speed for a specific helo. Its not a ship rating.


    And lots and lots of other things related to land, sea and air operation
    As are others..including myself both at sea and as a Operations officer at a airport that often handled SAR flights ....

    Export no....but have dealt with the specifics being discussed first hand..hence the photos!

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