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  • DF deployment to Chad

    Elite Unit for peace mission role in Chad

    October 11 2007

    SPECIALLY trained members of the Defence Forces' Elite Unit, the Army Ranger Wing, will be the first Irish peacekeeping troops on the ground in Chad.
    The Rangers will be deployed in Chad next month to provide protection for army engineers tasked with building a headquarters for the Irish deployment as part of the peace mission in Chad and the Central African Republic.
    It is expected that up to 350 Irish soldiers will be sent to the region.
    A reconnaissance team, including Irish personnel, is being sent to Chad today. It will determine what role the Irish contingent should play in the mission and will report back to the chief of staff of the Defence Forces, Lieut Gen Dermot Earley, who will then make recommendations to Defence Minister Willie O'Dea.
    Lieut Gen Earley said yesterday that it was likely the Irish would play a significant part in the mission and uppermost in his mind was the safety of any troops that might be deployed there in the coming weeks and months.



    http://www.independent.ie/national-n...d-1139575.html
    Last edited by Craghopper; 11 October 2007, 21:48.

  • #2
    transport

    Just wondering... How are they getting there? How will they get about once they've arrived?

    Comment


    • #3
      There they go with that 'safety' thing again.

      NTM
      Driver, tracks, troops.... Drive and adjust!!

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      • #4
        I think in Irish army parlance.....'safety = feasabilty'

        Both the liberia and East Timor missions were preceded by 'safety visits 'by the ARW
        Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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        • #5
          Hi there
          For feasability, read "chances of Irish bodies coming home in bodybags" feasability....Or how tooled up do we really have to be?
          regards
          GttC

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          • #6
            Originally posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
            For feasability, read "chances of Irish bodies coming home in bodybags" feasability....Or how tooled up do we really have to be?

            I'd say both
            Don't stand there GAWPING, like you've never seen the hand of God BEFORE!!

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            • #7
              With the attitude of the Sudanese armed forces towards the AU deployment it is likely that whatever goes out will have to be significantly tooled up. Could we see either or all of the Scorpions, 105's or ADR going overseas for the first time?

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              • #8
                I doubt it but they should bring some limited ad assets. I was watching a program on Darfur tonight and on it they mentioned a tactic employed during rebel attacks. They fly a converted Antonov cargo plane over the target village and drop make shift bombs on them. They are made from barrels and I wouldn't call them accurate but still a potential treat. Now I figure if they can do it so can their neighbours.
                "Those who have long enjoyed such privileges as we enjoy forget in time that men have died to win them." - Franklin D. Roosevelt

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                • #9
                  The Sudanese have been known to fly helicopters disguised in UN markings on attacks in the region.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi there
                    the Antonovs, used as makeshift bombers, are very effective, in that, whilst the accuracy of the bombs isn't very good, it's the fear they cause that paralyses movement on the ground.Also, since Africa is full of anonymous Antonovs, some on aid work, it is very difficult to identify good from bad.The Sudanese government also use Migs in rocket and gun attacks, against which the rebels and the innocent have little or no defence.
                    regards
                    GttC

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
                      Hi there
                      the Antonovs, used as makeshift bombers, are very effective, in that, whilst the accuracy of the bombs isn't very good, it's the fear they cause that paralyses movement on the ground.Also, since Africa is full of anonymous Antonovs, some on aid work, it is very difficult to identify good from bad.The Sudanese government also use Migs in rocket and gun attacks, against which the rebels and the innocent have little or no defence.
                      regards
                      GttC
                      I very much doubt that Irish troops will face an ariel campaign by Sudanese forces, if the Army even thought for a moment it would happen, we wouldn't be sent. I'm sure the Sudanese government wouldn't want all that Irish aid to stop either. If Irish troops were targeted then the aid would stop very quickly.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Don't forget the French Air Force have a permanent air base in Chad, equipped with Mirage F-1's. So the Sudanese would want to think twice before launching any kind of airborne attack on our troops.

                        The French learned their lesson in the Ivory Coast the hard way, I don't think they'd let it happen again. If there's a threat, I'm sure the ARW have it covered as well as they can.

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cy4Wks5wq4k
                        Last edited by pym; 12 October 2007, 15:16.

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                        • #13
                          Even as a deterrent a battery or two of EL-70 along with a few RBS70 would have a massive impact. The likes of an Antonov or a Hip would be easy fodder to this combination and they would reduce the Mig 23/A-5's to operations from altitudes where unguided rocket attacks would be almost impossible and accurate bombing highly unlikely. The ADR hardly took the opportunity to wind up the Giraffe radar at the Salthill airshow for no reason other than to take the opportunity to track a few "fast movers". It was not open to the public.
                          On the point of the Scorpions and the 105's surely with the sheer scale of the rebel attack on the AU base heavy fire support is a major issue. It's an area where we have very little assets and consideration must be given to the deployment of what we have in this area. Remember, the Scorpions were considered for Liberia and in my opinion when that deployment began things were a lot less volatile in that country than this proposed mission. Is anyone else of the opinion that the proposed deployment of 350 is a bit on the light side in terms of numbers considering the geographical isolation of the region?
                          Last edited by Jetjock; 12 October 2007, 15:40.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by The Thing View Post
                            I very much doubt that Irish troops will face an ariel campaign by Sudanese forces, if the Army even thought for a moment it would happen, we wouldn't be sent.
                            Really? Have you heard of the Israeli Air Force? They operated with no problem in South Lebanon while Irish troops were there. The decision to deploy troops is not in the remit of the DF. It's made at government level. Apart from that nobody in the DF is going to say it's too dangerous to send our lads to some place. It's an army for Christ sake. It's suposed to be dangerous.

                            Originally posted by The Thing View Post
                            I'm sure the Sudanese government wouldn't want all that Irish aid to stop either. If Irish troops were targeted then the aid would stop very quickly.
                            That's a laugh, Brian Lenihan was yukking it up in the Gulf with the PLO while they were murdering Irish troops in Lebanon in 1980. You'll be lucky if the majority of Irish people even know there are Irish troops in the region when they are feeding the Starvin' Marvins..
                            Last edited by Groundhog; 12 October 2007, 15:30.
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                            Say NO to violence against Women

                            Originally posted by hedgehog
                            My favourite moment was when the
                            Originally posted by hedgehog
                            red headed old dear got a smack on her ginger head

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                            • #15
                              ADR were deployed with ONUC in the 60s.

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