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Which corps serves most overseas?

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  • Which corps serves most overseas?

    Just wondering what people think on which corps have the highest chance of overseas be it observer or peacekeeping for a) enlisted men, b) officers and c) reserve personnel

  • #2
    Infantry and Transport Corps.

    Reserve would in the beginning be support, maybe infantry after a few years proper training.
    It is only by contemplation of the incompetent that we can appreciate the difficulties and accomplishments of the competent.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Bam Bam
      Infantry and Transport Corps.

      Reserve would in the beginning be support, maybe infantry after a few years proper training.
      You are kidding in saying Infantry, aren't you?
      The corps with the best chance of serving abroad are the Combat Service
      Support units, i.e; Medics, Tpt, Engineers, where such folks have civvy
      skills they can bring to bear in their appointments. As an example, the
      breakdown of the US Army Reserve is as follows:



      The definitions as per this website are:
      Combat Service Support: Medical, Finance, Supply, Quartermaster, Transportation, Judge Advocate, Petroleum/Water, Logistics, Administrative Services, Civil Affairs, Fixed-Wing Aviation

      Mobilization Base Expansion: Training Divisions, Garrisons, Schools, Hospitals, Depot Support, Port Operations

      Combat Support: Signal, Chemical, Military Police, Engineer, Military Intelligence, Psychological Operations, Medium Helicopter Support

      Combat: Infantry, Attack Aviation

      (Courtesy of http://www4.army.mil/USAR/home/index.php)

      Obviously we don't have all these subsections, but as can be seen from the
      above, CSS forms the largest part of their reserve, and their Reserve fills
      the highest proportion of these CSS appointments in the US Army overall...
      Truck Driver
      Captain
      Last edited by Truck Driver; 8 November 2004, 00:37.
      "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

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      • #4
        Infantry reserve have been fed the line that they will be going overseas,and dome have believed it. There is a shortage of Drivers in the PDF,but there are no shortage of infantrymen.


        Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

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        • #5
          Ireckon a cavalry troop would be required given the range of skills available....ddrivers signals ....gunners ...recce and so on...any other units that possess thes skills are high on the wanted list .Also a requiremnet for infantry to fillout field positions.

          Ithink eventually but not in my life time all aspects of the RDF will have to be deployed given the current undermanning in the army.
          Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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          • #6
            Coming From A Man Who Has 5 Trips Overseas.
            I Would Have To Say That Transport Get More Overseas More Regular. But If Your In The Infantry You Can Serve Overseas At Least Evrey Year. It Depends On Your Command. (enlisted).
            For Reserve Personal, I Have Being Involved In Trainning The Reserve Unit In My Barracks. And Aldo 60% Of Them Are Very Eagar In The Army They Would Need To Do At Least 4 Months In The Regs Before They Are Considered For Overseas Service.
            Remember We Are Going Fron Peace Keeping To Peace Enforcement On Every New Mission

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            • #7
              2 people from my unit have been overseas. Granted one was given a short commision. Medics will be among the first to serve overseas.
              If your not in bed by 4 o' clock it's time to go home!

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              • #8
                MPs are also in short supply

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                • #9
                  Truck Driver:

                  Just a small point for clarification...
                  That chart and those figures are correct for US Army Reserve, but, reserve component combat arms units, eg Infantry, Artillery, Armor/Cavalry, Combat Engineers, Special Forces, etc, are for the most part contained in the Army National Guard.

                  You have to figure in the two "sections" of the reserve component (Reserve and National Guard) to get the full picture.

                  Later.
                  No-one, I think, is in my tree...

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                  • #10
                    Aye, I was trying to make the point that the bulk of the US Reserve forces would be
                    composed of CSS type units..
                    "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MORTAR DAN
                      Coming From A Man Who Has 5 Trips Overseas.
                      I Would Have To Say That Transport Get More Overseas More Regular. But If Your In The Infantry You Can Serve Overseas At Least Evrey Year. It Depends On Your Command. (enlisted).
                      For Reserve Personal, I Have Being Involved In Trainning The Reserve Unit In My Barracks. And Aldo 60% Of Them Are Very Eagar In The Army They Would Need To Do At Least 4 Months In The Regs Before They Are Considered For Overseas Service.
                      Remember We Are Going Fron Peace Keeping To Peace Enforcement On Every New Mission
                      Sound info, which corps would be the best for officers seen as the ratio of infantry officers compared to infantry officers needed for overseas must be farely low.

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                      • #12
                        Sticking with the question at hand which I believe is related to the Irish Defence Forces or it would have been asked on a different site. In an Irish battalion overseas, there are usually only 2-3 transport officers whereas there are many more officers from infantry and cavalry. As far as enlisted personnel, it is hard to say because everybody is an infantryman overseas with the exception of medics and MP's. In addition, every memebr of the Defence Forces including the Naval Service and the Air Corps may apply for a rifleman's spot. But only the corps members may apply for a technical spot. There are many drivers overseas but they are not all from transport units. In fact most of them are not from transport units. In Lebanon, anybody who could drive was allowed to drive because you did not need to have an army license to drive. You simply took a quick test with a transport NCO and were given the green light to drive UN vehicles. Infantry signalmen were not allowed to hold a signalman's position in the overseas battalions because the corps units took those spots. Those spots accounted for 1 platoon from HQ Coy with 1 NCO and 3 detailed to each company. These spots could be filled from the Naval Service or the Air Corps but not from the infantry. The transport platoon was filled by the corps but they had notihng to do with the day to day transport needs of the battalion and concentrated on supplies and bus driving to and from the rear area. I think the answere is clear....there are hundreds of infantry vacancies in a battalion that can be filled by anybody but the corps spots are reserved for the corps units. Therefore, many members of the corps units went overseas every second six months for their entire career serving either as infantry or as their corps position. For example, soldier #1 is a rifleman in the 1st infantry battalion. He may go only as an infantryman whereas soldier #2 is employed as a linesman / driver in the signal corps. Soldier #2 may go as an infantryman, a driver, a linesman or as a radio operator. If you add the fact that either on may go as an acting rank above their own the corps soldier gets an even bigger advantage.

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                        • #13
                          medics and units with specilalist skills will be one of the first to serve over seas already rdf medics have been over seas .corps units in the pdf have low numbers so rdf ranks will be used to fill these places
                          ________
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                          Last edited by Cpl Legs Lane; 20 January 2011, 13:36.
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                          • #14
                            Infantry signalmen were not allowed to hold a signalman's position in the overseas battalions because the corps units took those spots. Those spots accounted for 1 platoon from HQ Coy with 1 NCO and 3 detailed to each company. These spots could be filled from the Naval Service or the Air Corps but not from the infantry.
                            Not true, Reg Sigs qualified personnel from infantry (or Cav, Arty or anyone else) can serve as radio operators overseas. If they are Commop qualified, they can serve as Commops.

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                            • #15
                              If you go back and read my post you will see that I said "In Lebanon". In Lebanon, there was a signal platoon which was part of HQ company. This signal platoon was made up of signalmen from Army, Navy and Air Corps. The signal platoon was made up of members of the signal corps and not infantry signallers. There is a huge difference between the two. From this platoon, 1 Cpl. and three Sgmn. were detailied out to A, B, C and Recce companies respectively. Occasionally, one of the spots in the companies might be filled by somebody else due to injury or illness but this was rare.

                              My real point was that members of the corps units could all take infantry spots while infantry members could not fill the corps units spots. That's all. In addition, by radio operator or signalman, I do not mean the guy who carries a radio around on his back and talks into it. I mean the guy he is talking to at the other end who sits in a nice room with a TV and movies 24hrs. a day.
                              Last edited by Ex-soldier; 10 November 2004, 05:42.

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