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  • Methods of Command

    LordFlash meant to post:
    Since there was a posting on comissions and officers, perhaps we should have a poll on methods of command?
    Which is best:
    A) The hands on (light infantry) approach (involved with training, familiarity with the ranks, tasking the troops with self disipline)
    B) The hands off approach (leave training in the hands of NCO's, keep a distance from the rankers, strict imposed disipline)
    C) Combination of both
    38
    Hands on Approach
    23.68%
    9
    Hands off
    2.63%
    1
    Combination
    73.68%
    28

  • #2
    This topic kinda got ignored on its first outing, any contributions?
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    With 50,000 men getting killed a week, who's going to miss a pigeon?

    Guns don't kill people, bullets kill people.

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    • #3
      Tasty one this!

      Respect for rank comes from (in my opinion) being able to do the job well.
      I presume we are only disscussing officers here, But in my experience the best officer I ever worked with was a real hands on type (in itself very unusual in the Irish DF)

      If officers are going to be directly involved with trg they require a very high level of subject knowledge, and practical experience of what they are talking about.

      As an example can you imagine a newly commed 2/lt giving a lecture to a group of soldiers just back from an operational tour. Sure the troops will sit through it (probably because they have to) but more likely than not they will be thinking "how can this idiot lecture to us when he/she is straight off the conveyor belt"

      Also if an officer is seen to be unable to carry out a task better than the people he commands then any credibility he has goes out the window. I'm not saying offr's are infallable, but if they are going to put themselves on show, they are as well to ensure they are very good at what they are doing.

      To quote a British Army LT Col "The secret of being a good officer is to do exactly what your NCO's tell you to do and then make it look like it was your idea in the first place"

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      • #4
        Has to be the Hands on approach, if the commanding officers are to distant from the men no trust is formed and their is no confidence in their leadership skills!
        Over the centuries, mankind has tried many ways of combating the forces of evil...prayer, fasting, good works and so on. Up until Doom, no one seemed to have thought about the double-barrel shotgun. Eat leaden death, demon...

        http://www.iamawesome.com/

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        • #5
          I know there are exceptions but I don't honestly believe that many people have faith in Irish offr's leadership skills anyway

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          • #6
            I feel a combination of both is best as sometimes officers can be a hinderence to training rather than help and sometimes the opposite is true. Most officers especially are very hands on and are will to help out and are not a hinderence but are really a good help. Some older officers you want to kepp as far a wa as possible.
            Only the dead have seen the end of war - Plato

            "Where there is no guidance the people fall, but in abundance of counselors there is victory" Proverbs 11-14
            http://munsterfireandrescue.com

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            • #7
              I take it you mean RDF officers as being helpful. Most PDF offrs would work to keep warm

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              • #8
                As with everything, a moderate approach is best. I think it's better if the NCO's do all the classroom and theory work, and the officers only come in on practical experience such as shooting and being on the ground.

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                • #9
                  Why?

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                  • #10
                    One word "Israel"
                    "It is a general popular error to imagine that loudest complainers for the public to be the most anxious for it's welfare" Edmund Burke

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                    • #11
                      There is no way you can compare the IDF to us.

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                      • #12
                        I'm not I'm suggesting that their training technique is best,, for warfighting troops anyway, I doubt they'd make good OOTW personnel
                        "It is a general popular error to imagine that loudest complainers for the public to be the most anxious for it's welfare" Edmund Burke

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                        • #13
                          A combination of both is the best, but only if you have a good officer, a bad one will just end up pissing off the NCO's and pull rank to cover up his/her mistakes.

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                          • #14
                            In our Bn our PDF officers do help out alot compaired to others I have seen. The new breed of RDF officer is a whole lot better that his / her older conterpart.
                            Only the dead have seen the end of war - Plato

                            "Where there is no guidance the people fall, but in abundance of counselors there is victory" Proverbs 11-14
                            http://munsterfireandrescue.com

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