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Irish Words of Command

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  • spike
    replied
    [
    point taken, like i said i've heard both but can't for the life of me remember which one i've seen written

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by spike
    Quit your bitchin' guys, think i've heard both at some stage over the last number of years. think it depends on which manual or version of it the instructor had. Outside of training depots the current manual(even if its 30 or 40 years old)can be like hens teeth.
    I'm pretty sure it's not in the manual, and this is where the confusion arises.

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    Thank your for that interesting to hear wht the older guys have to say

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  • spike
    replied
    Quit your bitchin' guys, think i've heard both at some stage over the last number of years. think it depends on which manual or version of it the instructor had. Outside of training depots the current manual(even if its 30 or 40 years old)can be like hens teeth.
    Last edited by spike; 26 June 2006, 00:15.

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    Barry thats really trivial..I never termed it to be correct just pointing out what was used...

    How bad 18months in the RDf and he's an expert

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Thats where you are wrong baz.
    The Master at arms words are Gospel.
    Sorry.

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  • Barry
    replied
    Just because the master at arms or 2IC says it doesn't make it correct either. Di cludaigh is what I've read is to be used in funeral drill, so it's not too mad to say that it could be considered official

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    Just because Barry say it and kermit confirms doesn't make it right.

    The fact that the Naval Service master at arms and 2ic of the base used capini diobh..and cludaigh goes to show the diversification in terms.

    I'll telling it as I remember it and some others will confirm this to be the case.

    Happening I have better things to do with my time rather than invent Iiish words of command!

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  • happenin
    replied
    Originally posted by Barry
    Di-cludaigh is the only command I've ever heard used for this

    Cludaigh

    As for the details of how to do it (left hand or right hand), it's usually made up by whoever is giving the command.
    Hate to say it but i agree with barry.(off to buy something that will get rid of the horrible taste that statement just left behind) I've only ever heard Di cludaigh( capini diobh sounds a bit makey uppey) When i did it it was right hand and hold over the left breast.(MMMMmmm)

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  • Barry
    replied
    Originally posted by Truck Driver
    While we're on the subject of Irish words of command, what's the command for
    "Remove Hats" ?
    Di-cludaigh is the only command I've ever heard used for this
    Originally posted by Truck Driver
    Am presuming there is also a corresponding "Put Your Hat On" command....
    Cludaigh

    As for the details of how to do it (left hand or right hand), it's usually made up by whoever is giving the command.

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    caipini diobh..and cludaigh!

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  • Truck Driver
    replied
    While we're on the subject of Irish words of command, what's the command for
    "Remove Hats" ?

    The Pln Offr on my Pot NCO Cse was fond of using it when he was involved in our
    training clases.

    Am presuming there is also a corresponding "Put Your Hat On" command....

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  • hptmurphy
    replied
    It hasn't changed that much...even the peeps involved in the re org got things like the Irish traslation of 'Cavalry' .

    remember the standardisation of the irish word of command only came about to save the army having to pay an allowance.

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  • Docman
    replied
    Originally posted by WES
    There is an Irish/English dictionary of military terms going about. Library in the Curragh or any BTC may have one.
    Have one in my hand

    Focail Orduithe (Words of command)... dated 1952

    It's even older than the Foot drill manual.

    Seemingly the was a big change in the way Irish was pronounced and written (incl grammer) in the early 1970s. Henceall the confusion with manuals using phrases that are no longer valid.

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  • Darksaga
    replied
    I have my Dads NCO book that he had during the course, i use it now to get ready for my basic so im not completely clueless as to whats goin on.

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