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  • The SRR/14 Int coy

    I dont know of any other military that has such a unit, yet they perform a vital role.

    http://www.eliteukforces.info/specia...ance-regiment/

    Special Reconnaissance Regiment - Role and Organisation

    It is believed that one of the main roles of the SRR is to support SAS/SBS special operations by providing close target reconnaissance, surveillance and 'eyes-on' intelligence. The regiment employs state-of-the-art electronic surveillance gear to eavesdrop on their targets.

    Little is publicly known about the SRR's size or structure. Recent press reports have put the regiment at company size - around 150 operatives. The SRR is believed to be based alongside the SAS at RHQ Credenhill, near Hereford.

    It has been reported that the SRR sometimes deploys as a Specialist Reconnaissaince Detachment, or 'SpR Det', which has a focus on a specific task.(1)


    Global War On Terror

    Various brief mentions of the SRR have surfaced in press reports from Iraq and Afghanistan. A number of SRR operatives are believed to be operating alongside Task Force Black, an SAS Squadron assigned to a joint international task force hunting Al Qaeda with the US Delta force.


    Following a grueling selection process, SRR operatives are trained in the arts of surveillance, photography, close quarters battle (CQB) and advanced driving. (see 14 Company section for more details of such training). With the shift of emphasis to operations in the Middle-East, SRR operatives are likely to become proficient in Mid-Eastern languages such as Arabic and Farsi.

    In NI

    http://www.eliteukforces.info/the-det/
    Vanguard
    Banned User
    Last edited by Vanguard; 3 August 2010, 19:34.

  • #2
    I can't think of a similar unit in the US, many of the jobs would probably be undertaken by the intelligence community rather than the military (ie the CIA etc).

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    • #3
      Originally posted by DeV View Post
      I can't think of a similar unit in the US, many of the jobs would probably be undertaken by the intelligence community rather than the military (ie the CIA etc).
      Intelligence Support Activity

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      • #4
        good bunch of lads and very busy globally right now.
        RGJ

        ...Once a Rifleman - Always a Rifleman... Celer et Audax

        The Rifles

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        • #5
          Originally posted by DeV View Post
          I can't think of a similar unit in the US, many of the jobs would probably be undertaken by the intelligence community rather than the military (ie the CIA etc).
          Sounds like USMC Force Recon to me: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Force_Reconnaissance
          "Everyone's for a free Tibet, but no one's for freeing Tibet." -Mark Steyn. What an IMO-centric quote, eh?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by faughanballagh View Post
            Sounds like USMC Force Recon to me: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Force_Reconnaissance
            Do the Force Recon do Undercover stuff in Civi's ? because thats what SRR and the ISA do.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Craghopper View Post
              Do the Force Recon do Undercover stuff in Civi's ? because thats what SRR and the ISA do.
              No, that'd be illegal here. So I guess it's different in that sense, I just saw some parallels on the battlefield.
              "Everyone's for a free Tibet, but no one's for freeing Tibet." -Mark Steyn. What an IMO-centric quote, eh?

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              • #8
                Srr

                Sounds like a crossover between BA pathfinders and the unit involved in the taking down of the Gib 3 in 1988

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                • #9
                  Gibraltar was SAS, these guys are human intelligence specialists

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                  • #10
                    As per Craghopper's post there is a unit similar in the US army - they are active here and are mentioned in the book "Not a Good Day to Die".
                    There may be only one time in your life when your country will call upon you and you will be the only one who can do the nasty job that has to be done -- do it or forever after there will be the taste of ashes in your mouth.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Muzzle View Post
                      Gibraltar was SAS, these guys are human intelligence specialists

                      There is a cross over though esp in NI, 14 Int and the SAS worked together, the GIB intel. specialists were most likely 14 Int coy but those who done the shooting SAS. SAS troopers also do tours with the SRR/14 int coy, to further various skills.

                      Curiously one of those IRA members killed at Gib was was shagging a 14 int coy member for yrs(the unit was called sas by the press). Seems undovercover soldiers got alot closer then many realise.

                      After leaving alot of the guys go into private surveilance work, or work for MI5 as survilance experts, not particularly well paid,(when they can earn 100k working for arabs or russians) only about 45k per yr with very long hours.

                      Selection is very psychological, being put under pressure with choices to make, also alot of memory stuff, sleep deprivation, team build exercises, language exercises, the SAS instructors attempt to physically and mentally provoke/make candidates crack, woken by thunderflashes at 4am when exhausted to do PT and long tabs after being told the next 2 days were free. Presentations which are shot down, and exercises where candidates have 48 hours to get from one part of the country to another to a safe hse or RVP, yrs ago anything went with this, but a candidate robbed a post office to fund his journey, lol. Also alot of training with foreign weapons.

                      http://www.amazon.com/Shoot-Kill-Sto.../dp/1857825055

                      Scott Graham was a formidable SAS soldier. Decorated for his heroism in Northern Ireland and the Falklands, he fought gun battles in which more than a dozen IRA terrorists were killed. Mairead Farrell planted bombs for the IRA. For 14 years they carried on a clandestine affair, which reached its crescendo with the controversial shooting of three unarmed IRA terrorists on the Rock of Gibraltar. This is the true story of this extraordinary romance, and of the killings that shocked the world.
                      Vanguard
                      Banned User
                      Last edited by Vanguard; 5 August 2010, 09:52.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Vanguard View Post
                        The Fishers of Men!


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                        • #13
                          'The Operators' by James Rennie was one of the first book on the subject and dealt with the selection and training process and their involvement in operations in Northern Ireland in the late Eighties early nineties.

                          'The Fishers of Men' also deals with the subject although can be a little heavy going at times.

                          'She who Dared ' by Jackie George..from a females perspective...questionable writing skills but an insight none the less

                          'One Up' by Sarah Ford, same deal as the previous but better read.

                          Subject well covered despite its relative low profile.

                          these people are nothing new
                          Covid 19 is not over ....it's still very real..Hand Hygiene, Social Distancing and Masks.. keep safe

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                          • #14
                            Srr

                            with reference to crossover re Gib job, often wondered about that job and indeed the shooting on the Tube in London by Police of the South American commuter in that in both instances there was insufficient evidence to stop and arrest suspects yet there was overwhelming evidence to justify killing the subjects in a jurisdiction where there is no capital punishment, makes you wonder what ROE thes outfits have.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by hptmurphy View Post
                              'The Operators' by James Rennie was one of the first book on the subject and dealt with the selection and training process and their involvement in operations in Northern Ireland in the late Eighties early nineties.

                              'The Fishers of Men' also deals with the subject although can be a little heavy going at times.

                              'She who Dared ' by Jackie George..from a females perspective...questionable writing skills but an insight none the less

                              'One Up' by Sarah Ford, same deal as the previous but better read.

                              Subject well covered despite its relative low profile.

                              these people are nothing new


                              Thats right "James Rennie" ie Captain Simon Hayward, was one of the first to out the unit along with alot of claims about activities in NI, he got busted in Europe with a large stash of drugs and jailed, claims MI5 set him up, to teach him a lesson. Later wrote a book called the operators.

                              http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/c...-simon-hayward

                              Exactly 63 days ago, Captain Simon Hayward, a 31-year-old captain in the Life Guards, was arrested in Sweden. He was driving a Jaguar car, belonging to his brother Christopher, back to England from Ibiza where he had been on holiday. The considerable extra distance that he was travelling was to enable him to put in a couple of days ski-ing at the invitation of a casual acquaintance known to his brother. That acquaintance, thought by Captain Hayward to be a Swede and using a Swedish-sounding name, was in fact a Scotsman known as Cay Forbes Mitchell who, it seems, had been under observation by the Swedish police for a considerable time, suspected of being involved in drug trafficking.
                              Vanguard
                              Banned User
                              Last edited by Vanguard; 5 August 2010, 21:43.

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