Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen encouraged to become Teachers

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen encouraged to become Teachers

    Plans to encourage Service personnel leaving the British Armed Forces to become teachers were announced yesterday, 24 November 2010, as part of the Schools White Paper released by the Department for Education.

    Part of the plan relates to Armed Forces leavers. The White Paper states:

    "We will encourage Armed Forces leavers to become teachers by developing a 'Troops to Teachers' programme which will sponsor Service leavers to train as teachers.

    "We will pay tuition fees for PGCEs [postgraduate certificates in education] for eligible graduates leaving the Armed Forces and work with universities to explore the possibility of establishing a bespoke compressed undergraduate route into teaching targeted at Armed Forces leavers who have the relevant experience and skills but may lack degree-level qualifications.


    "We will encourage Teach First* to work with the Services as they develop Teach Next, so that Service leavers are able to take advantage of new opportunities to move into education.

    "Service leavers also have a great deal to offer young people as mentors and we will be looking to increase opportunities for this."

    www.mod.uk/troops_to_teachers

    an outstanding initiative that will benefit both ex-forces personnel and children alike, especially with the MoD now paying for servicemen to complete their postgraduate certificates in education, and it may instil some more discipline at this important age among our youth.
    Last edited by RoyalGreenJacket; 25 November 2010, 20:30.
    RGJ

    ...Once a Rifleman - Always a Rifleman... Celer et Audax

    The Rifles

  • #2
    Seems like a excellent opportunity for guys leaving the services.

    Teachers unions will probably try and block it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by sofa View Post
      Seems like a excellent opportunity for guys leaving the services.

      Teachers unions will probably try and block it.
      Not for the next while. The Brits are luring irish grads over because they can't get people to do it over there. 3/4 grand up front to start and all. I'd actually consider it in other circumstances!

      Comment


      • #4
        Not a bad idea, especially for NCO's who are experienced in MOI (and dealing with rowdy classes ) As long as they remember they can't give physical corrective actions, unfortunately.
        "Attack your attic with a Steyr....as seen on the Late Late Show..."

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by concussion View Post
          Not a bad idea, especially for NCO's who are experienced in MOI (and dealing with rowdy classes ) As long as they remember they can't give physical corrective actions, unfortunately.
          i once strangled a lad with his own rifle sling because he was being a mong during the lesson and kept failing to fit his sling properly - needless to say he never slinged a weapon wrongly again, however i don't think stuff like that would go down too well in a school classroom!
          RGJ

          ...Once a Rifleman - Always a Rifleman... Celer et Audax

          The Rifles

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by RoyalGreenJacket View Post
            i once strangled a lad with his own rifle sling because he was being a mong during the lesson and kept failing to fit his sling properly - needless to say he never slinged a weapon wrongly again, however i don't think stuff like that would go down too well in a school classroom!
            I see the this idea going something like this

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhlWddAXSRA
            "Everyone's for a free Tibet, but no one's for freeing Tibet." -Mark Steyn. What an IMO-centric quote, eh?

            Comment


            • #7
              My Old Man retired from the Army after 23 years to become a teacher. He recently retired from teaching too. So that's two pensions he now gets, then comes the state pension at 65, I believe. Not bad work if you can get it.

              Also, I remember going to an ICAREC meeting with my Dad once about 2003. There the idea is for ex-servicemen to present to those leaving the service about what they did when they left, and how to get into their respective industries. It's a great networking platform which I was too young and naive to take full advantage of, but there were consultants and directors from Control Risk, Task International, Banks, among others and then my Dad, who stood up and promoted teaching when you left the service.
              I think afterwards, only one girl came up to him to follow up on the teaching, and that was more as a back up plan than anything else, considering all the "sexy" jobs on offer involving risk management and security consultancy in the industry's boom years. It would seem now that the security consultancy market is over saturated, civvy teachers can't handle the kids who have reducing respect for their peers and now understand and exploit their 'rights' far too much, so why not send in lads who might be able to command the kids' attention for a few moments more until the facination about their new teacher's combat experience wears off.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by RoyalGreenJacket View Post
                i once strangled a lad with his own rifle sling because he was being a mong during the lesson and kept failing to fit his sling properly - needless to say he never slinged a weapon wrongly again, however i don't think stuff like that would go down too well in a school classroom!
                Especially seeing as the word your looking for is 'slung'- I doubt you'd be getting into a class room in a hurry,
                Last edited by turbocalves; 26 November 2010, 22:39.
                But there's no danger
                It's a professional career
                Though it could be arranged
                With just a word in Mr. Churchill's ear
                If you're out of luck you're out of work
                We could send you to johannesburg.

                (Elvis Costello, Olivers Army)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by turbocalves View Post
                  Especially seeing as the word you looking for is 'slung'- I doubt you'd be getting into a class room in a hurry,
                  teeheehee


                  Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by turbocalves View Post
                    Especially seeing as the word your looking for is 'slung'- I doubt you'd be getting into a class room in a hurry,
                    Especially seeing as I am in the British Army and 'slinged' is as word we use on a daily basis when talking about weapons systems; just like the word "dhobi" which is also not in the Collins Englsih dictionary however I have been saying it and doing it in the British Army for the past 21 years.

                    No doubt you, and infact many teachers have all 'googled' something or 'skyped' someone - even though no such words exists either.

                    Small things for small minds eh?

                    P.S. Come back to me when you sort your grammar and punctuation out; it should be: "...word you're looking...", not: "...word your looking...", and you really should end your sentences with a full stop and not a comma - no stars for you Mister Turbocalves.
                    Last edited by RoyalGreenJacket; 27 November 2010, 04:01.
                    RGJ

                    ...Once a Rifleman - Always a Rifleman... Celer et Audax

                    The Rifles

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      zing!


                      Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RoyalGreenJacket View Post
                        Especially seeing as I am in the British Army and 'slinged' is as word we use on a daily basis when talking about weapons systems; just like the word "dhobi" which is also not in the Collins Englsih dictionary however I have been saying it and doing it in the British Army for the past 21 years.

                        No doubt you, and infact many teachers have all 'googled' something or 'skyped' someone - even though no such words exists either.

                        Small things for small minds eh?

                        P.S. Come back to me when you sort your grammar and punctuation out; it should be: "...word you're looking...", not: "...word your looking...", and you really should end your sentences with a full stop and not a comma - no stars for you Mister Turbocalves.
                        I really couldnt resist it.

                        http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/googled

                        google

                        Ads by Google
                        Audit Your Google Docs
                        Get an audit trail of your company's google docs.
                        www.aprigo.com
                        goo·gle verb, often capitalized \ˈgü-gəl\
                        goo·gledgoo·gling\-g(ə-)liŋ\
                        Definition of GOOGLE
                        transitive verb
                        : to use the Google search engine to obtain information about (as a person) on the World Wide Web
                        Examples of GOOGLE
                        Then where are they going, if not to Faulkner and Achebe and Naipaul? … To the movies; to television (hours and hours); to Googling obsessively (hours and hours); to blogging and emailing and text messaging… . —Cynthia Ozick, Harper's, April 200

                        slinged
                        The word you've entered isn't in the dictionary. Click on a spelling suggestion below or try again using the search bar above.

                        And yes I know I am

                        pedantic

                        Ads by Google
                        Cluas: Asperger Syndrome
                        A child with Asperger's discovers how to listen, then better interact
                        www.Cluas.ie/Aspergers Syndrome
                        pe·dan·tic adj \pi-ˈdan-tik\
                        Definition of PEDANTIC
                        1: of, relating to, or being a pedant(see pedant)
                        2: narrowly, stodgily, and often ostentatiously learned
                        3: unimaginative, pedestrian
                        — pe·dan·ti·cal·ly\-ˈdan-ti-k(ə-)lē\ adverb
                        Examples of PEDANTIC
                        It may seem pedantic to harp on what looks like mere procedure, but this is one case where the process is the forest. —Hendrik Hertzberg, New Yorker, 29 May 2000
                        Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
                        Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
                        The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere***
                        The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
                        The best lack all conviction, while the worst
                        Are full of passionate intensity.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by hedgehog View Post
                          ahhh yes Hedgie - that world famous dictionary that is the Merriam Webster dictionary

                          now try find 'googled' in the Oxford English Dictionary or the Collins English Dictionary and you will not.

                          stick to drinking Guinness mate
                          Last edited by RoyalGreenJacket; 28 November 2010, 03:44.
                          RGJ

                          ...Once a Rifleman - Always a Rifleman... Celer et Audax

                          The Rifles

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            ahhh yes Hedgie - that world famous dictionary that is the Merriam Webster dictionary

                            now try find 'googled' in the Oxford English Dictionary or the Collins English Dictionary and you will not.

                            stick to drinking Guinness mate

                            You seem to forget RGJ that you said


                            No doubt you, and infact many teachers have all 'googled' something or 'skyped' someone - even though no such words exists either.
                            I merely pointed out to you that- even apart from your own post- googled is recognised by some as a proper word

                            and
                            Especially seeing as I am in the Irish Army and 'googled' is as word we use on a daily basis when talking about having a look at something; just like the word "mingi" which is also not in the Collins Englsih dictionary however I have been saying it and doing it in the Irish Army for the past 25 years.

                            and an example would be,

                            Question- CS how did verify the entimology of that word?

                            Ans- I googled it.

                            In my Unit (ex) Googled is the past tense of gander

                            as in- did you have a gander at the soccer results- reply- yes I googled them earlier.


                            .ahhh yes Hedgie - that world famous dictionary that is the Merriam Webster dictionary
                            Did you know that Harvard dont accept the OED or the CED as a source of reference,

                            DCU uses the Harvard referencing system and so in theory the OED and CED are not recognised as sources of
                            reference- a bit like wiki and (insert segway) Google itself.

                            putt that in your glass of cream sherry -(there would be a smiley head here indicating I am winding you up- but I am fecked if I can find the little bollixes)
                            Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
                            Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
                            The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere***
                            The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
                            The best lack all conviction, while the worst
                            Are full of passionate intensity.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              lol you sound like you are on the gargle already Hedgie!

                              anyway who gives a fcuk about my inglish - i'm not goin ta b a teecher in ani skool aniways - except for people who can't string a sentence together who get upset about how we drag words we use in the army into civvi street.

                              have a nice chillaxed sunday old pal.
                              RGJ

                              ...Once a Rifleman - Always a Rifleman... Celer et Audax

                              The Rifles

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X