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  • NZ SAS to stay in Afghanistan for another year

    The New Zealand Prime Minister John Key has confirmed that the New Zealand SAS deployment to Kabul, Afghanistan, will be extended for another year from April.

    Mr Key said:

    "The SAS are extremely well respected for what they do, so obviously our traditional allies on the ground in Afghanistan, the United States, Britain, Australia and Canada, and others, obviously would love to see the New Zealand SAS there because they do a great job and they make a real difference."

    The New Zealand SAS will focus primarily on partnering with the Afghan Crisis Response Unit and ensuring the work they have been carrying out to bring that unit to a high operational standard is completed. This is the main reason for the extension of the deployment.
    "


    NZ SAS soldiers in Afghanistan

    read more here: www.newstalkzb.co.nz/sas_extend_afghanistan

    the British Defence Secretary Dr Liam Fox welcomed this decision and said:

    "This is a great example to many of the sleeping giants who have greater capability and greater budgets who should be showing the level of commitment that is being shown by New Zealand."

    i agree - there are many other nations (not just the sleeping giants) SF troops who could get stuck in.
    RGJ

    ...Once a Rifleman - Always a Rifleman... Celer et Audax

    The Rifles

  • #2


    Your man on the right is in the hang over

    But there's no danger
    It's a professional career
    Though it could be arranged
    With just a word in Mr. Churchill's ear
    If you're out of luck you're out of work
    We could send you to johannesburg.

    (Elvis Costello, Olivers Army)

    Comment


    • #3
      He is actually a highly decorated SAS Cpl.. That photo showed him back in A-Stan after receiving a Victoria Cross.

      In total disregard of his own safety, Lance Corporal Apiata stood up and lifted his comrade bodily. He then carried him across the seventy metres of broken, rocky and fire swept ground, fully exposed in the glare of battle to heavy enemy fire and into the face of returning fire from the main Troop position. That neither he nor his colleague were hit is scarcely possible. Having delivered his wounded companion to relative shelter with the remainder of the patrol, Lance Corporal Apiata re-armed himself and rejoined the fight in counter-attack.
      Last edited by Craghopper; 4 February 2011, 14:09.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Craghopper View Post
        He is actually a highly decorated SAS Cpl.. That photo showed him back in A-Stan after receiving a Victoria Cross.

        I knew I recognised his face, by all accounts a very brave soldier and a VC winner too.

        Comment


        • #5


          Cpl Apiata VC

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by turbocalves View Post

            Your man on the right is in the hang over
            Beat me to it.
            "Everyone's for a free Tibet, but no one's for freeing Tibet." -Mark Steyn. What an IMO-centric quote, eh?

            Comment


            • #7
              yeah but hes still in the hangover

              Comment


              • #8
                yeah but hes still in the hangover
                He obviously brought his wolfpack to Afghnistan.

                Got to work with them on my tour when we did a joint OP. Very professional, got none of the "we're SF, your part-timers" nonsense from them. Great bunch.
                There may be only one time in your life when your country will call upon you and you will be the only one who can do the nasty job that has to be done -- do it or forever after there will be the taste of ashes in your mouth.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ARNGScout View Post
                  He obviously brought his wolfpack to Afghnistan.

                  Got to work with them on my tour when we did a joint OP. Very professional, got none of the "we're SF, your part-timers" nonsense from them. Great bunch.

                  Agreed ARNG,
                  David Maloney, who was interviewed here on NZ Radio served with the NZ SAS in Vietnam and eventually commanded NZ SAS and was also CO of the NZ Army contingent monitoring the ceasefire in Rhodesia- he was an incredible leader and one of the most down to earth guys you could meet.




                  http://www.radiolive.co.nz/LUSH--Dav...4/Default.aspx

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rod and serpent View Post


                    Cpl Apiata VC
                    Not to be negative now, but anyone else struck by the fact that he's only a corporal (he's apparently been in since 1989...maybe the fact that the majority of that service was in the Territorial Force makes a difference)?
                    "Everyone's for a free Tibet, but no one's for freeing Tibet." -Mark Steyn. What an IMO-centric quote, eh?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by faughanballagh View Post
                      Not to be negative now, but anyone else struck by the fact that he's only a corporal (he's apparently been in since 1989...maybe the fact that the majority of that service was in the Territorial Force makes a difference)?
                      Promotion must be slow.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by faughanballagh View Post
                        Not to be negative now, but anyone else struck by the fact that he's only a corporal (he's apparently been in since 1989...maybe the fact that the majority of that service was in the Territorial Force makes a difference)?

                        Nice bit of background here- he might have even learned a bit from working alonside the ARW

                        http://news.tangatawhenua.com/archives/4220

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by turbocalves View Post


                          Your man on the right is in the hang over

                          THAT was exactly my reaction when I saw this picture for the first time !



                          Originally posted by ARNGScout View Post
                          He obviously brought his wolfpack to Afghnistan.

                          Got to work with them on my tour when we did a joint OP. Very professional, got none of the "we're SF, your part-timers" nonsense from them. Great bunch.
                          Yep, I' ve met a lad from ARW on a Defence Forces course in the past, and it was the
                          exact same in terms of attitude, fair play...
                          "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Funnily enough the other guy with the helmet made me think of
                            this lad ....

                            "Well, stone me! We've had cocaine, bribery and Arsenal scoring two goals at home. But just when you thought there were truly no surprises left in football, Vinnie Jones turns out to be an international player!" (Jimmy Greaves)!"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by faughanballagh View Post
                              Not to be negative now, but anyone else struck by the fact that he's only a corporal (he's apparently been in since 1989...maybe the fact that the majority of that service was in the Territorial Force makes a difference)?
                              Could it be that the NZDF is small and that the NZSAS being a fairly smaller portion of said organisation which one would presume has not got huge turn over, would slow down the rate of promotion.

                              Or maybe hes happy being a Cpl, outside the US its not a bad rank to have in that one has direct contact with the troops at the cutting edge of things, whereas in the US (I believe the marines are slightly different) its seems to be a side step rather than a promotion. (though I may be wrong on this).
                              But there's no danger
                              It's a professional career
                              Though it could be arranged
                              With just a word in Mr. Churchill's ear
                              If you're out of luck you're out of work
                              We could send you to johannesburg.

                              (Elvis Costello, Olivers Army)

                              Comment

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