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  • British forces ration packs?

    Quick question for our anglo cousins.I am a little bit confused.The MOD is introducing new"Multi climate" ration packs and new "12 hour Lightweight ration packs" for its forces deployed on Ops.What i want to know is have these new packs replaced the standard 24 hour Operational ration pack(ORP)? Or are they a theatre specific issue?IE Op.Herrick.
    "Let us be clear about three facts. First, all battles and all wars are won in the end by the infantryman. Secondly, the infantryman always bears the brunt. His casualties are heavier, he suffers greater extremes of discomfort and fatigue than the other arms. Thirdly, the art of the infantryman is less stereotyped and far harder to acquire in modern war than that of any other arm." ------- Field Marshall Wavell, April 1945.

  • #2
    Originally posted by apod View Post
    "12 hour Lightweight ration packs" for its forces deployed on Ops.
    This consists of a sandwich and beef jerky?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by DeV View Post
      This consists of a sandwich and beef jerky?
      And a free McFlurry from MacDonalds- if you are in uniform!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Plus 20% off a new BMW, but thanks again for reminding me Tim.

        I am back in the UK in April so i'll pass on what i know then but i haven't seen them here in Canada yet.

        It is a lot more than a sandwich and jerky though!
        RGJ

        ...Once a Rifleman - Always a Rifleman... Celer et Audax

        The Rifles

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        • #5
          Is this what your looking for?

          http://www.army.mod.uk/news/23235.aspx
          SWIFT AND BOLD

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          • #6
            Thanks RGJ.I already know what in them.Just interested to know what ,if anything,they are replacing?But thanks for the offer of a helpfull answer.
            Thanks Tim.As usual your posts are about as usefull as a chocalate fireguard
            "Let us be clear about three facts. First, all battles and all wars are won in the end by the infantryman. Secondly, the infantryman always bears the brunt. His casualties are heavier, he suffers greater extremes of discomfort and fatigue than the other arms. Thirdly, the art of the infantryman is less stereotyped and far harder to acquire in modern war than that of any other arm." ------- Field Marshall Wavell, April 1945.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by apod View Post
              Thanks RGJ.I already know what in them.Just interested to know what ,if anything,they are replacing?But thanks for the offer of a helpfull answer.
              Thanks Tim.As usual your posts are about as usefull as a chocalate fireguard

              RHODESIAN RAT PACKS
              Ration packs

              The military nutrition experts had a hand in the design of these little brown boxes filled with things that were supposed to be good for us.
              There were three varieties, (A), (B) or (C) packs, but Heaven alone knows what the difference between them was. They looked exactly the same.
              Inside these “Jamstealer Gift Boxes” there were all sorts of exciting things. Every one had a pack of “biscuits”. These would have made a hyena stop laughing and, if you were to glue them to yourself, there would have been no cause for the invention of Kevlar body armour. If you soaked them in water or boiled the living daylights out of them, you got a sort of gooey target paste, which tasted exactly like…gooey target paste. The Rhodesian bush, when archaeologists from the future start rummaging around, will yield up millions of these slightly pale, oversized dominoes. It will puzzle them too that they will be dug up in close proximity to the shattered remains of the teeth of powerfully jawed carnivores and hominids.
              The tins of “Braised Liver” were of great interest. We had never seen green liver before and especially liver that smelled like the inside of a Sumo wrestler’s jock strap. Few of us actually ate it, so it is not possible to describe the taste. I feel sure it would have been memorable.
              In a little silver and gold foil sachet could be found the notorious “Curry Powder” packed by Messrs Khatri Brothers of Salisbury. I never did meet with one of these brothers so I was unable to ask how they had managed to discover a wrapping foil so robust that it could contain this “Universal Solvent”…it went straight through anything, turned everything yellow and yet somehow proved to be a very effective radiator sealant for Bedfords and Landrovers.
              A favourite was the “Condensed Milk”. This was Nestle’s finest and came in small tins or, at one time, in plastic tubes. As tea was always welcome out in the bundu this was a very tradable commodity.
              Some “ratpacks” very thoughtfully provided a few sheets of the famous “Bronco” toilet paper which was savage stuff, but still preferable to the use of large leaves for personal hygiene needs. There were a lot of stinging nettles in parts of Rhodesia…
              “Baked Beans” were almost always included in the ration, so quiet nights were often punctuated by intermittent blasts of flatulence, which put even the elephant to flight.
              The sustenance was always welcome, but the side effects were not.

              Some contained little tins of jellied methylated spirits. The idea was that you opened this tin and found a way to perch your mess tin of graze an inch or two above the flame. I bought a very clever Swedish designed petrol primus from a camping store in Salisbury. This little gem came in it’s own canister which doubled as two cooking pots and required no priming or pumping. As long as you could filch half a pint of army petrol you only had to warm the tank with your hands to send enough up the stem to set fire to it. In a minute or two the thing would be purring contentedly and a little later a brew could be enjoyed while your mates were still trying to coax their stoves into life. It was swiped shortly before I left the army and I have never found a replacement. To the thief I say, “May your chickens all choke and the fleas of a thousand camels infest your armpits!”
              Posted by Beaver Shaw at 7:26 AM 0 comments Links to this post

              There were in fact different packs for African Troops/Police to meet different tastes- we used to swop dishes quite often in the bush. Unlike the writer above I found the packs to be quite tasty.

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              • #8
                RGJ

                ...Once a Rifleman - Always a Rifleman... Celer et Audax

                The Rifles

                Comment


                • #9
                  I say again Tim.Usefull as a chocalate fireguard.Not relevant and in no way answers my question.But hey thanks for contributing
                  If i asked a question about leprosey would you answer with a reply about APC tires?
                  Now if anyone else has something usefull and to the point to offer.......
                  "Let us be clear about three facts. First, all battles and all wars are won in the end by the infantryman. Secondly, the infantryman always bears the brunt. His casualties are heavier, he suffers greater extremes of discomfort and fatigue than the other arms. Thirdly, the art of the infantryman is less stereotyped and far harder to acquire in modern war than that of any other arm." ------- Field Marshall Wavell, April 1945.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    APOD

                    Not gospel (as am not in usual location) but from having seen the americans use their equivalent , its not replacing anything. They are for a specific use ( operations ) I am assuming ( assumption being the mother of all f**k ups ) that our forces will do likewise and use them for operational uses only, where space for items like rations is very limited
                    Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier - Samuel Johnson

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by knocker View Post
                      APOD

                      Not gospel (as am not in usual location) but from having seen the americans use their equivalent , its not replacing anything. They are for a specific use ( operations ) I am assuming ( assumption being the mother of all f**k ups ) that our forces will do likewise and use them for operational uses only, where space for items like rations is very limited
                      I take it you are refering to the 12 hour ration pack pictured above?I believe the U.S version are called "freedom rations" IIRC.Basically a eat as you go patrol ration.
                      I am refering to the 24 hour Multi climate ration packs that have been recently introduced.This is what i am on about.
                      Attached Files
                      Last edited by apod; 3 March 2011, 23:17.
                      "Let us be clear about three facts. First, all battles and all wars are won in the end by the infantryman. Secondly, the infantryman always bears the brunt. His casualties are heavier, he suffers greater extremes of discomfort and fatigue than the other arms. Thirdly, the art of the infantryman is less stereotyped and far harder to acquire in modern war than that of any other arm." ------- Field Marshall Wavell, April 1945.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        i'm pretty sure we have some back in barracks in the UK.

                        i'll dig out the menu sheet and post it on here and you can work it out.
                        RGJ

                        ...Once a Rifleman - Always a Rifleman... Celer et Audax

                        The Rifles

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by apod View Post
                          I say again Tim.Usefull as a chocalate fireguard.Not relevant and in no way answers my question.But hey thanks for contributing
                          If i asked a question about leprosey would you answer with a reply about APC tires?
                          Now if anyone else has something usefull and to the point to offer.......

                          apod: all th menus are here


                          http://rations.vesteyfoods.com/ratio....asp?ptypeID=4

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                          • #14
                            Thank you Tim but i already had that information and link.My question still remains unanswered.
                            "Let us be clear about three facts. First, all battles and all wars are won in the end by the infantryman. Secondly, the infantryman always bears the brunt. His casualties are heavier, he suffers greater extremes of discomfort and fatigue than the other arms. Thirdly, the art of the infantryman is less stereotyped and far harder to acquire in modern war than that of any other arm." ------- Field Marshall Wavell, April 1945.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Kinda answered here apod, http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/De...eFrontLine.htm
                              Everyone who's ever loved you was wrong.

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