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  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Hi all,
    there are many accounts in naval histories of boilers exploding upon the inrush of freezing water after a torpedo impact. I have never heard of a torpedo setting off small arms ammunition.

    regards
    GttC

    Leave a comment:


  • Victor
    replied
    Second 'Lusitania' explosion was from boiler, documentary claims

    Second 'Lusitania' explosion was from boiler, documentary claims
    LOUISE ROSEINGRAVE

    Fresh revelations into the sinking of the Lusitania claim to debunk theories that an explosion of munitions on board caused the ship to sink rapidly, claiming 1,198 lives.

    The Cunard vessel was sailing from New York to Liverpool in 1915 when it was hit by a German torpedo. Passengers reported a second explosion, sparking debate that the liner was carrying a secret cache of munitions.

    But a new National Geographic documentary, to be aired on July 15th, claims the second explosion was caused by one of the ship’s boilers. The documentary suggests the rapid sinking was caused by the damage from the initial torpedo.

    The ship’s owner, Gregg Bemis (84), was involved in the dive but he disagrees with scientists’ findings in follow-up laboratory research.

    The 790ft-long vessel sits in 300ft of water 18km off the Kinsale coast.

    Historian Dermot Ryan, from Kinsale, where an inquest into the sinking took place, said he “would be inclined to agree with Bemis”.

    “This [new information] is in line with previous British reactions to having a store of munitions on the ship. We know there were bullets on board but was there something bigger?” Mr Ryan said.


    http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/...319428462.html

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  • Duffman
    replied
    Originally posted by pym View Post
    Apart from a few million rounds of .303 ammunition?
    I've heard crusty diver tales of blocks of .303 ammo scattered around the site.

    Leave a comment:


  • pym
    replied
    Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
    Should make for interesting viewing. Seems they discovered no arms of any sort were being carried.
    Apart from a few million rounds of .303 ammunition?

    Leave a comment:


  • Victor
    replied
    "No evidence that explosives speeded Lusitania's sinking" - the Kaiserliche Marine might disagree.

    How confined a space is need for gun cotton to explode as opposed to burn?

    Leave a comment:


  • Victor
    replied
    No evidence that explosives speeded Lusitania's sinking

    No evidence that explosives speeded Lusitania's sinking
    By Jasper Copping
    Sunday July 01 2012

    For almost a century, the sinking of the RMS Lusitania has remained shrouded in secrecy. The Cunard liner was torpedoed on May 7, 1915, by the German submarine U-20 while steaming from New York to London.

    It sank in 18 minutes, eight miles off the coast of Ireland, with the loss of 1,198 civilian lives. Most of the dead were British, although 114 Americans were among the victims.

    Since the day the Lusitania went down, some experts have blamed the British for the high loss of life, claiming that they illegally stowed a cargo of high explosives on board, concealed as cheese or casks of beef on the ship's manifest.

    The explosives were said to have caused a second, larger blast after the impact of the torpedo, causing the 790ft liner to sink rapidly before help could arrive.

    But now scientific research has debunked these theories.

    The researchers sent a camera 20ft into the wreck, which lies at a depth of 300ft, to inspect the cargo hold and blast damage. They then conducted tests at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in California.

    They analysed the various theories: that the second explosion was the result of aluminium, which was used to make landmines, and gun cotton, an artillery propellant.

    They found the appearance of an aluminium explosion was very different to that reported by survivors, while gun cotton would have exploded instantaneously, rather than after a delay of 15 to 20 seconds.

    Instead, they concluded the second blast was a boiler explosion, which did not itself cause significant damage. The rapid sinking, they concluded, was simply due to damage caused by the torpedo strike.

    © Telegraph

    - Jasper Copping


    http://www.independent.ie/world-news...g-3154607.html

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Yeah, that seems to have been discounted now, and the second, fatal explosion was caused by Coal Dust.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lorenco
    replied
    Originally posted by Goldie fish View Post
    Mark you calendar folks.
    July 15th National Geographic Channel.

    A dive (assisted by the Irish Government) was recently carried out for Nat Geo on Lusitania. I believe ILS Granuaile was involved in the dive using ROV.

    Should make for interesting viewing. Seems they discovered no arms of any sort were being carried.


    Strange that? The theory is that the torpedo that struck her was not enough to sink her so quickly and the sinking was caused by the cargo exploding.

    Leave a comment:


  • Goldie fish
    replied
    Mark you calendar folks.
    July 15th National Geographic Channel.

    A dive (assisted by the Irish Government) was recently carried out for Nat Geo on Lusitania. I believe ILS Granuaile was involved in the dive using ROV.

    Should make for interesting viewing. Seems they discovered no arms of any sort were being carried.

    Leave a comment:


  • Goldie fish
    replied
    I just missed the program myself.

    Leave a comment:


  • techman1
    started a topic Lusitania

    Lusitania

    I hope I have the right Thread for this important Event

    I watched at the BBC programme to-night (sunday) at 2000hrs 'Lusitania: murder in the Atlantic'.

    The programme to me lefted holes open as to were the screen/fleet protection was on the south coast.....given that the nearest base was Cork....Bere Island etc. It's kind of clear that the Admirity felt there was no threat from the eastern approaches... no protection..etc
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