Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pilot's error blamed for bombs that brought second world war to Dublin

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • fredleander
    replied
    I wouldn't be surprised that such incidents could happen with all the air activity at the time but I have never heard of it. There must have been more than one...?

    Leave a comment:


  • Jetjock
    replied
    Anyone with 3E(satellite/cable), there is a program on now about this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Victor
    replied
    North Strand anniversary: Envoy extends sympathy over bombings

    North Strand anniversary: Envoy extends sympathy over bombings
    KITTY HOLLAND

    GERMANY’S WISH was to stand with the Irish people “in present times of need”, the German ambassador to Ireland has said.

    Speaking at a memorial ceremony in Dublin yesterday to mark the 70th anniversary of the German bombing of the North Strand, Busso von Alvensleben said the event reminded us how “tremendously precious peace is”.

    “The North Strand bombing in 1941 brought death and suffering into this city and to its inhabitants. My deep sympathy and respect are with the survivors and families and friends of the victims.”

    Twenty-nine people died on the night of May 31st, 1941, when four bombs dropped on the North Strand. Many more died in the days and weeks afterwards and hundreds of people were left homeless.

    Mr von Alvensleben said it was the experience of war that spurred the people of Europe to the project of peace and reconciliation out of which the European Union was founded.

    “We stand by each other still today. Germany remembers when Irish families opened their homes and fostered German youngsters.” Germany’s ongoing wish was to stand with Ireland “in present times of need”.

    About 300 people attended the event in a memorial garden planted and refurbished to mark the anniversary, at Marino College on the North Strand. Among them were some with personal memories, including St John’s Ambulance worker Noel Brady (91), and many family members of people who had been there.

    Richard Fitzpatrick’s father had just left the area, having recently married and moved to Stoneybatter. His grandfather Richard, grandmother Ellen, aunt Madge and uncle Noel were all killed. “My grandfather had been a butcher at No 28 North Strand. Luckily my father, also Richard, had just married my mother, Josephine, and moved.” Asked whether he had spoken about the bombings, he replied, “rarely”.

    “In the 1960s we were unusual in having a car. We used to go on Sunday drives to Howth and Malahide, and we’d drive through the North Strand. He’d say: ‘That’s where the bombing was. Say a prayer for them.’ It must have been very traumatic because he had to go to the morgue to identify his parents, brother and sister. There was no counselling or chatting back then either.”

    Councillor Ray McAdam, representing the Lord Mayor of Dublin, said yesterday was about remembering the dead, and also those who lived, “who bore deep physical and, or, emotional scars ever since”.

    In the weeks after the bombings the strengths of the community came to the fore. He spoke of Dublin Fire Brigade, St John’s Ambulance Brigade, off-duty doctors and nurses and priests.

    After the ceremony, a lamp was lit and carried from the garden to nearby St Agatha’s Church for a remembrance prayer service.


    http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/...298206544.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Victor
    replied
    1941 North Strand bombings remembered

    1941 North Strand bombings remembered
    Updated: 19:46, Tuesday, 31 May 2011

    A memorial garden dedicated to those who lost their lives in bombing of Dublin's North Strand was re-opened today to mark the 70th anniversary of the incident.

    Relatives of those killed and locals who witnessed the bombings were among those who attended the event in the grounds of Marino College in Dublin.

    German aircraft dropped several bombs on North Strand on 31 May 1941.

    28 people were killed, 90 were injured and around 300 homes were damaged or destroyed.

    It has never been established why Hitler's forces dropped bombs; if it was an attempt to force Ireland into war, or a reprisal for the assistance given by Dublin Fire Brigade during the Belfast Blitz.

    Today hundreds of people took part in a walking tour of the area that visited some of the sites the bombs struck.

    Later, the German ambassador and the Deputy Lord Mayor of Dublin re-opened a memorial garden to the victims in the grounds of Marino College.

    A project to gather an oral history of the bombing being compiled by Dublin City Council is continuing throughout the 70th anniversary so the events of that night in 1941 are never forgotten.


    http://www.rte.ie/news/2011/0531/northstrand.html

    Leave a comment:


  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Read what I said again. The Blackout was enforced rigidly in the UK because the citizens knew that showing a light could mean death, whereas the city of Dublin and the surrounds were not blacked out to the same extent,or the actual blackout regulations enforced to the same extent, which is why German and British pilots were able to distinguish it from UK cities. Also, Dublin's AA defences were nowhere near the level encountered over the UK. Any German pilot heading North up the Irish Sea knew that the lit-up towns and cities to his left had to be neutral Eire, whereas the darkened landmass to his right could only be the UK.
    Personally,I think it was not a deliberate-policy attack, as everyone understood that if the Luftwaffe could strike Belfast, then anywhere else on the island was open to raiding.
    regards
    GttC

    Leave a comment:


  • Connaught Stranger
    replied
    Originally posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
    Hi there
    The pilot would have looked down upon a lit(by comparison with blacked-out British cities) city, with very light anti-aircraft fire, no night-fighters, with a mountain range to the South, flat ground to the North and a wide bay and a river disecting the city and he would have been in no doubt about where he was. German pilots were known to have used Dublin as a navigation landmark for attacking Belfast and the British industrial heartlands of Manchester, Liverpool and Birmingham. The British did use beam-bending, as it was known, as well as radio jamming and false German-speaking fighter controllers, so the pilot might well have been confused, given that he was supposed to have circled for an hour. Perhaps it was simply other Heinkels passing through? Perhaps he thought he was over the British East coast.
    Who knows.
    regards
    GttC
    Unless you were there on that particular night with that pilot, then there is no way you can say for certain what he saw, only speculate.

    If there was any deliberate policy, I believe the South would have seen more attacks than they did get.

    Connaught Stranger

    Leave a comment:


  • GoneToTheCanner
    replied
    Hi there
    The pilot would have looked down upon a lit(by comparison with blacked-out British cities) city, with very light anti-aircraft fire, no night-fighters, with a mountain range to the South, flat ground to the North and a wide bay and a river disecting the city and he would have been in no doubt about where he was. German pilots were known to have used Dublin as a navigation landmark for attacking Belfast and the British industrial heartlands of Manchester, Liverpool and Birmingham. The British did use beam-bending, as it was known, as well as radio jamming and false German-speaking fighter controllers, so the pilot might well have been confused, given that he was supposed to have circled for an hour. Perhaps it was simply other Heinkels passing through? Perhaps he thought he was over the British East coast.
    Who knows.
    regards
    GttC

    Leave a comment:


  • Pilot's error blamed for bombs that brought second world war to Dublin

    Pilot's error blamed for bombs that brought second world war to Dublin

    North Strand bombing 70 years ago tomorrow sparked rumours of a German attack on Irish neutrality, writes EOIN BURKE-KENNEDY

    THE TREMOR from the final and most devastating blast in Dublin was felt as far away as Mullingar.

    It was the last weekend in May, 70 years ago, the start of a sunny Whit Bank Holiday weekend, but it will forever be associated with the Republic’s worst wartime atrocity.

    On May 31st, 1941, a single low-flying German aircraft dropped four bombs on Dublin, the last of which hit the city’s North Strand area, killing 29 people and injuring 90.

    The evidence suggests the bombing was accidental, the action of a stray pilot most likely mistaking Dublin for a British city or responding to being fired upon by the Army’s anti-aircraft guns, according to military historian Lar Joye.

    Rumours were rife at the time, however, that the raid was a deliberate attack on Ireland’s neutrality and the forerunner to an invasion by one of the warring parties, Joye said.

    “One theory was that Ireland had been targeted by Germany for sending firefighters to Belfast to help tackle fires caused by German air raids six week previous.”

    Another rumour which surfaced was that Britain had discovered a way of “bending” German radio beams and were directing enemy bombers off target, in this case to Ireland, said Joye, curator at the National Museum, Collins Barracks.

    According to an Army report, the aircraft approached Dublin from a southerly direction after flying up the east coast, a route often taken by German aircraft on their way to Belfast or Liverpool in the days before radar.

    On reaching the city, it flew around menacingly for up to an hour, jinking to avoid searchlight beams and drawing anti-aircraft fire from batteries in Stillorgan, Ballyfermot, Clontarf and finally Collinstown.

    At approximately 1.28am, the first bomb was sent whistling through the night sky, exploding in the Ballybough area, demolishing two houses on Summerhill Parade.

    This was followed by two more blasts, one of which left a crater on the North Circular Road, and another that landed in the Phoenix Park, shattering the windows in Áras an Uachtaráin and prompting a stampede of bison in the zoo.

    The fourth and most deadly bomb, a 500lb landmine believed to have been dropped by parachute, landed in the middle of the road outside Corcoran’s shop on the North Strand shortly after 2am.

    The bomb left a trail of devastation in its wake, destroying or damaging up to 300 houses and leaving dozens trapped under the debris. Four of the wrecked houses were tenements occupied by up to 80 people.

    Many of the other buildings were small labourers’ cottages, and were flattened by the force of the blast.

    Under the headline “Bombs In Dublin This Morning: Many Killed”, The Irish Times report from later that day, described a terrifying scene, “with people trapped in the debris crying for assistance, of little children shouting for their mothers, and of mothers who did not know the fate of their families”.

    The report stated: “On the footpaths people in their night clothes, covered in blood, lay moaning, and stretchers with the injured or dead passed to and fro from the scene of destruction.”

    In 1999, a German living in Canada, calling himself Heinrich, claimed in a radio interview that he was one of the Luftwaffe pilots involved in the Dublin bombing. He said his squadron had been tasked with bombing Belfast but had approached Dublin by mistake.

    On June 19th, 1941, de Valera’s government announced that Berlin, after previously denying the attack, had expressed regret for the bombing and had promised reparation.

    Compensation of £327,000 was eventually paid by West Germany in 1958.

    The lord mayor of Dublin, Gerry Breen, and the German ambassador to Ireland will unveil a commemorative plaque in the North Strand area tomorrow.

    Survivor’s account ‘it was utter devastation’

    NOEL FITZGERALD, who was 21 at the time of the bombing, recalls standing in the doorwell of his family home on 43 Summerhill Parade when the first bomb hit.

    “My mother and I were up late watching the anti-aircraft fire when suddenly there was a loud whistling noise, presumably the bomb dropping, and then a big flash.

    “The house collapsed inwards and the two of us were blown out on to the street.

    “The next thing I knew, we were frantically searching in the rubble for the rest of the family, with the help of the ARP wardens who had been quick to get there.

    “My sister, my grandmother, my aunt and my young cousin had been in bed at the time of the blast and were buried in the debris.

    “Miraculously, they all came out alive.

    “While we were trying to rescue the others, the big bomb in North Strand went off.

    “When all the family and neighbours were accounted for, I remember going down to the North Strand. It was utter devastation. There were people injured and dead lying on the street.

    “I was never taken in by the conspiracy theories. I always believed the planes which bombed the South had merely shed bombs to lighten their load before returning to Germany.

    “Although I do remember some people thinking that the anti-aircraft fire had provoked the bombing on the North Strand.

    “ Most people thought if they [Germany] wanted to hit Ireland, to bring the country into the war, they would have done so on a bigger scale.

    “After the bomb, my grandmother was taken to the Mater hospital where she died of pneumonia two weeks later.”

    The family was later rehoused in Cabra.

    “We got £20 worth of compensation from the Dublin Corporation, part of which I used to buy a suit.”


    http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/...298056896.html
Working...
X