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Fermoy Manoeuvres

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  • Goldie fish
    replied
    I may be wrong in this but I think Lt Ryans Brother was also killed in Fermoy,where his plane crashed. There was quite sensational pictures on the local papers at the time of the body of the obviously dead pilot being removed from the Wrecked aircraft,Which may have been a Myles Magister...but again I am unsure..

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  • Groundhog
    replied
    Lt Ryan is buried in the Rock of Cashel graveyard along with his two brothers who also died in service. One was killed in a plane crash during the war. I forget the circumstances of the third death which was after the war I think.

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  • Thorpe
    started a topic Fermoy Manoeuvres

    Fermoy Manoeuvres

    While reading on christmas day I found the following article in the supplement of our local paper.
    I will hopefully post the photographs that were included as soon as I can get to a scanner.

    Manoeuvres in Fermoy 1942, by Jim Bartley

    These photographs of army manoeuvres were taken at Ashe Quay, Fermoy in september 1942. These manoeuvres were a very serious business as it was most important that our army were at all times prepared for any eventuality.
    The Fermoy Bridge was mined during the peroid of World War II and could have been blown up at a moment`s notice. The bridge was so mined because in the event of a German invasion (which was a realistic possibility at the time) it would be blown uo to prevent the crossing of the Blackwater by the Germans.
    For this exercise it was presumed that the bridge was out of use and it was imperative that the neogiated the river. On the occasion of these manoeuvres two soldiers lost there lives endeavouring to cross the river from Ashes Quay to the Kings Inch on the north side - they were swimming across holding a rope which was secured at each side, unfortunately there were too many soldiers holding the rope and as the river was high the pressure became too great and the rope snapped, leaving many soldiers struggling in the water in full combats, rifles, helments, uniforms and in some cases with their boots tied around there necks.
    I was a young boy at that time and I will never forget that Sunday morning, the sight of all the soldiers in the river and the shouting, the noise and the excitment that suddenly turned into tragedy when it was realised that two soldiers were actually drowned.
    Today there is a plaque on the wall near the rowing club on Waterloo Lane, to commemorate the tragic deaths of two young men, Lieut. Thomas Ryan and Sgt. J. McElligott
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