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Bunker? Near halfway in cork

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  • Bunker? Near halfway in cork

    I drive past this twice a day and have been wondering is it a bunker or some agricultural structure? Opinions? Link to street view of it hopefully works.

    County Cork

    https://goo.gl/maps/M5TKi699XKk
    Everyone who's ever loved you was wrong.

  • #2
    Looks similar to point defence concrete structures (WW2) seen in England - mostly controlling major routes or potential coastal landing points.

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    • #3
      I have often wondered the exact same thing. It does control all approaches from what was the main road to west cork from the city. Not far either from the Ballinhassig rail tunnel, another pinch point to west cork.
      It does not appear on the 1913 OSI maps, so it is possibly a product of the Emergency.
      There was a similar one on Fota Island, covering approaches from Cobh, it is paired with a similar (if damp) nox on the Belvelly side.
      https://goo.gl/maps/ymosFew61Gn
      Last edited by na grohmiti; 6 April 2018, 22:31.
      German 1: Private Schnutz, I have bad news for you.
      German 2: Private? I am a general!
      German 1: That is the bad news.

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      • #4
        Main road to west Cork there was a river bridge there

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        • #5
          There are dozens of these Emergency era pillboxes still surviving around the country.
          I've seen several around the Curragh, Gormanston and along the river Boyne over the years.
          The Boyne and Blackwater were the 'Main Lines of Resistance' had the British invaded during WW2.

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          • #6
            Isnt there a thread on these bunkers?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Rhodes View Post
              There are dozens of these Emergency era pillboxes still surviving around the country.
              I've seen several around the Curragh, Gormanston and along the river Boyne over the years.
              The Boyne and Blackwater were the 'Main Lines of Resistance' had the British invaded during WW2.



              But would have been useless had the Nazis invaded I presume ?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by terrier View Post
                [/B]

                But would have been useless had the Nazis invaded I presume ?
                Blackwater is in the South so probably the most likely Nazi route as well

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                • #9
                  Blackwater would be one of the deepest rivers an invader would have to cross if they had invaded from Cork Harbour, as was expected.
                  German 1: Private Schnutz, I have bad news for you.
                  German 2: Private? I am a general!
                  German 1: That is the bad news.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Theres one lying on its side on the beach at Rosnowlagh in donegal

                    Theres also one over the rail line on the bridge at gormanston camp that leads down to the ranges.
                    https://www.google.ie/maps/@53.65036...7i13312!8i6656

                    Few more around drogheda etc
                    This is on the Slane Road out of drogheda and overlooks the Boyne river as well as covering the road.
                    https://www.google.ie/maps/@53.71955...7i13312!8i6656
                    Last edited by morpheus; 9 April 2018, 08:59.
                    "He is an enemy officer taken in battle and entitled to fair treatment."
                    "No, sir. He's a sergeant, and they don't deserve no respect at all, sir. I should know. They're cunning and artful, if they're any good. I wouldn't mind if he was an officer, sir. But sergeants are clever."

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                    • #11
                      There is another one near Drogheda along the R167 heading out towsrds the coast along the Boyne (Louth side), after the cement factory, before Baltray. It’s at a road junction.
                      Last edited by Flamingo; 9 April 2018, 10:39.
                      'He died who loved to live,' they'll say,
                      'Unselfishly so we might have today!'
                      Like hell! He fought because he had to fight;
                      He died that's all. It was his unlucky night.
                      http://www.salamanderoasis.org/poems...nnis/luck.html

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                      • #12
                        "Theres also one over the rail line on the bridge at gormanston camp that leads down to the ranges.
                        https://www.google.ie/maps/@53.65036...7i13312!8i6656"

                        Usually, the bunker is placed on the side where the attack is expected to come from. For the Gormanston bunker, it is on the camp side of the bridge. Were they expecting an attack coming from the camp towards the ranges?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by na grohmití View Post
                          Blackwater would be one of the deepest rivers an invader would have to cross if they had invaded from Cork Harbour, as was expected.
                          The German plan, I believe, was to start in Dungarvin.

                          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oper...reen_(Ireland)
                          Last edited by Flamingo; 9 April 2018, 15:23.
                          'He died who loved to live,' they'll say,
                          'Unselfishly so we might have today!'
                          Like hell! He fought because he had to fight;
                          He died that's all. It was his unlucky night.
                          http://www.salamanderoasis.org/poems...nnis/luck.html

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Pegasus View Post
                            "Theres also one over the rail line on the bridge at gormanston camp that leads down to the ranges.
                            https://www.google.ie/maps/@53.65036...7i13312!8i6656"

                            Usually, the bunker is placed on the side where the attack is expected to come from. For the Gormanston bunker, it is on the camp side of the bridge. Were they expecting an attack coming from the camp towards the ranges?
                            On most airfields in WWII the bunkers were sited to bring fire down on the airfield itself in the event of glider/paratrooper attack. You see the same siting on many disused UK airfields.
                            “The nation that will insist on drawing a broad line of demarcation between the fighting man and the thinking man is liable to find its fighting done by fools and its thinking done by cowards.”
                            ― Thucydides

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                            • #15
                              Also that defensive line was orientated to defend from an attack from NI

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