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Swastica and Shamrock

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  • Swastica and Shamrock

    Was wondering if anyone else saw this fine documentary on TG4 the other night(sat I think).
    An excellent story of the attempts by the Nazis to organise support from the IRA in assisting them in the war against Britain.

    The short story was that while both parties were willing,the Nazis did not consider the IRA to be competent enough to carry out the task efficiently,having nothing but good intentions,but lacking in actual technical or tactical ability.
    One agent commented that the most advanced form of secret communications the IRA used was a handwritten note,hidden in a ladies sock......

    My video was busy this weekend.


    Catch-22 says they have a right to do anything we can't stop them from doing.

  • #2
    I think informers were a problem for the IRA during this time - it must have been, the few German agents landed in Ireland were picked up pretty quickly, Herman Goertz being the most famous.

    Curious as to how SF/IRA don't dwell on this aspect of their history - there's a Christy Moore Song, (written, I think, by Bobby Sands) about the heroes who went off to fight Franco, led by Frank Ryan and the O'Duffy crew fighting under the swastika - the same Frank Ryan who was hobnobbing with the Nazis....amazing how even today SF/IRA can shrug off their connections with internatioanl pariahs such as FARC and get away with it pretty easily.
    combatlogo
    The Man on the Telly
    Last edited by combatlogo; 8 June 2004, 22:47.
    "Hello, Good Evening and Bollocks..."

    Roger Mellie

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    • #3
      The most comprehensive account of this period I read was in Robert Fisk's "Ireland, Ulster and the Price of Neutrality". It's a well researched book that is a fascinating read. - the ineptness and incompetance of the both the IRA and the Abwher is staggering.

      This was long before Fisk embarked on the useless diatribes that saw his name enter the vernacular.
      Meh.

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      • #4
        Stephen Hayes was Chief of Staff of the IRA in Ireland during the Emergency. He was a Garda agent also. Pretty embarrassing for the IRA at the time. Hayes was detained and questioned by his subordinates, which must have done wonders for morale and discipline. He wrote an enormous confession to delay his inevitable execution and managed to escape in September 1941, whereupon he promptly handed himself into the Gardai.

        Amongst his betrayals was informing the GS about IRA arms dumps in Wexford for which a man named Devereux was shot in Tipperary. His murderer was executed in Portlaois. Between this kind of thing, turncoat Chiefs of Staff and internment the only mystery is how did the IRA recover after the war and mount a campaign in the 50s.
        sigpic
        Say NO to violence against Women

        Originally posted by hedgehog
        My favourite moment was when the
        Originally posted by hedgehog
        red headed old dear got a smack on her ginger head

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        • #5
          There was a severe lack of jobs. When this happens people get bored and recruiters win every time. An idle mind is the devil's playground!
          The worst sin toward our fellow creatures is not to hate them, but to be indifferent to them: that's the essence of inhumanity.
          (George Bernard Shaw, Playwright, 1856 - 1950)

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