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  • #16
    Originally posted by X-RayOne View Post
    It's a good opportunity to significantly lighten a fixed load troops have to carry and get the benefits of increased speed, agility and reduced weight stress.
    If these factors aren't the main considerations (take that sufficient ballistic protection is a given) somebody has taken eye off the ball.
    as to your point about current kit, yes absolutely must be lighter, slimmer than it. How much more is the key thing to maximize.
    Have you read the review group report?
    "Let us be clear about three facts. First, all battles and all wars are won in the end by the infantryman. Secondly, the infantryman always bears the brunt. His casualties are heavier, he suffers greater extremes of discomfort and fatigue than the other arms. Thirdly, the art of the infantryman is less stereotyped and far harder to acquire in modern war than that of any other arm." ------- Field Marshall Wavell, April 1945.

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    • #17
      Nope. But enlighten us with the bullet point recommendations please.
      Fate whispers to the warrior, "There is a storm coming"

      And the warrior whispers back "I am the storm".

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      • #18
        1/ Single colour.To future proof against uniform pattern changes
        2/ Laser cut MOLLE
        3/ Scalable
        4/ Single variant.Females to be accommodated with greater size range.
        5/ Soft armour and plates
        6/ Suite of pouches.

        There are a few other recommendations but they are not for discussion on the open forum.
        "Let us be clear about three facts. First, all battles and all wars are won in the end by the infantryman. Secondly, the infantryman always bears the brunt. His casualties are heavier, he suffers greater extremes of discomfort and fatigue than the other arms. Thirdly, the art of the infantryman is less stereotyped and far harder to acquire in modern war than that of any other arm." ------- Field Marshall Wavell, April 1945.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by apod View Post
          1/ Single colour.To future proof against uniform pattern changes
          2/ Laser cut MOLLE
          3/ Scalable
          4/ Single variant.Females to be accommodated with greater size range.
          5/ Soft armour and plates
          6/ Suite of pouches.

          There are a few other recommendations but they are not for discussion on the open forum.

          Single colour, guessing olive green, will be interesting in desert environments
          It is only by contemplation of the incompetent that we can appreciate the difficulties and accomplishments of the competent.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Bam Bam View Post
            Single colour, guessing olive green, will be interesting in desert environments
            Actually, it should be fine - firstly because most arid environments aren't nearly as light in tone as people think, and secondly because as soon as it gets a coating of dust, anything olive green just merges into the background.

            I was in Northern Iraq - Kurdistan - several times this year and MTP was fine, my green daysack was moderately dirty and it didn't stick out at all. Lots of people
            around Erbil were in variants of the old US Woodland pattern and with just a day's worth of dust on them they didn't look out of place at all.

            As long as it's not too dark, dull, a bit dusty/dirty and IRR it will be fine.
            Last edited by ropebag; 19 December 2018, 18:17.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Bam Bam View Post
              Single colour, guessing olive green, will be interesting in desert environments
              Probably not Olive green. Probably sage green or grey green maybe even some version of khaki or coyote tan. Either way it will be optimised to work with what we have now and a possible new pattern in the future.
              "Let us be clear about three facts. First, all battles and all wars are won in the end by the infantryman. Secondly, the infantryman always bears the brunt. His casualties are heavier, he suffers greater extremes of discomfort and fatigue than the other arms. Thirdly, the art of the infantryman is less stereotyped and far harder to acquire in modern war than that of any other arm." ------- Field Marshall Wavell, April 1945.

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              • #22
                Second one or fourth one looks best to me. Light enough for comfort but still look very solid. My only gripe with number 4 is the laser cut MOLLE. Don't know if anyone else has used it but I personally don't like it. Think it's too awkward to sinch MOLLE into it. Hopefully these go through

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                • #23
                  Laser cut is what is wanted

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by DeV View Post
                    Laser cut is what is wanted
                    Is it for the lighter weight? or just an attempt to get ahead of the webbing curve? Also, looking at the photo of the armour in the room, I have to say I do like the look of the new smock apart from those UBAC style pockets being too low. What's the deal with the hoods? Removed altogether, zip outs or some other attachment system?

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                    • #25
                      Laser cut reduces fabric weight and bulk because less stitching, threads, etc. needed.

                      Smock hood looks like zip off by photo inside room. Good idea to be removable whichever way it works.
                      Fate whispers to the warrior, "There is a storm coming"

                      And the warrior whispers back "I am the storm".

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Smock hood is button on.Pictures of same in the Soldier 2017 thread.
                        "Let us be clear about three facts. First, all battles and all wars are won in the end by the infantryman. Secondly, the infantryman always bears the brunt. His casualties are heavier, he suffers greater extremes of discomfort and fatigue than the other arms. Thirdly, the art of the infantryman is less stereotyped and far harder to acquire in modern war than that of any other arm." ------- Field Marshall Wavell, April 1945.

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                        • #27
                          Bit of a question, I'll understand if no one wants to answer. Are the helmets being replaced too...it's just a photo has popped up with lads wearing distinctly not reg helmets...

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                          • #28
                            What picture?
                            Sir I cant find my peltors........Private they are on your face

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by spider pig View Post
                              What picture?


                              Might be 2 lads from the wing...but jut seemed odd.

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                              • #30
                                Normally when lads from the Wing go on "green Army" courses they are expected to wear the same kit as the rest of us mere mortals.The Gucci kit gets left in the unit until the course is over.

                                AFAIK the Infantry Platoon Sgts course are trialing some new kit.And yeah.The GSBA report recommended a helmet upgrade.(Four point harness,upgraded ballistic protection,integrated NVG mount etc)
                                Last edited by apod; 26 February 2019, 20:17.
                                "Let us be clear about three facts. First, all battles and all wars are won in the end by the infantryman. Secondly, the infantryman always bears the brunt. His casualties are heavier, he suffers greater extremes of discomfort and fatigue than the other arms. Thirdly, the art of the infantryman is less stereotyped and far harder to acquire in modern war than that of any other arm." ------- Field Marshall Wavell, April 1945.

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