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  1. #151
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    Thats €0.87bn for the 5 aircraft, plus full simulator package, and all associated support infastructure. Given the expected time in service (based on the aircraft being replaced) that is great VFM.
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  2. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anzac View Post
    https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/...ir-force-fleet

    NZ Government has confirmed the acquisition of five Lockheed Martin C-130J-30 Super Hercules.

    https://www.beehive.govt.nz/sites/de...0Factsheet.pdf

    These are the latest Block 8.1 aircraft which include additional ISR capabilities. Will arrive in 2024 and fleet IOC in 2025. The B752 replacement project starts next year with an IOC in 2028.
    What kind of ISR?

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeV View Post
    What kind of ISR?
    Other than the MX-20HD and MIDS-Link 16 the only additional statement about the contract is "this purchase also includes sensors and performance improvements that will assist New Zealand during extensive maritime surveillance and reconnaissance as well as improve its search and rescue capability."

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  5. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anzac View Post
    Other than the MX-20HD and MIDS-Link 16 the only additional statement about the contract is "this purchase also includes sensors and performance improvements that will assist New Zealand during extensive maritime surveillance and reconnaissance as well as improve its search and rescue capability."
    Wonder how many C-130Js with ISR package the DF could have got instead of 4 PC-12s and 2 CN-295s

    €0.87 Billion for 5 aircraft for about 20 years is €8.7 mil per year per aircraft.

  6. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by TangoSierra View Post
    Wonder how many C-130Js with ISR package the DF could have got instead of 4 PC-12s and 2 CN-295s

    €0.87 Billion for 5 aircraft for about 20 years is €8.7 mil per year per aircraft.
    Well the 4 PC12s and 2 C295s are costing € 258m not sure about the support package

  7. #156
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    RNZN took delivery earlier of it's largest vessel from South Korean shipbuilders, Aotearoa is making her way to New Zealand as we speak.

    https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news...a/#prettyPhoto
    HHI Delivers Royal New Zealand Navy’s Largest Ever Vessel – HMNZS Aotearoa
    The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN)’s largest-ever vessel built by Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) departed for its maiden voyage home. HHI announced today (June 10) that it held a sail-off ceremony for the 26,000-ton logistics support vessel, HMNZS Aotearoa.
    Xavier Vavasseur 10 Jun 2020

    The vessel, measuring 173.2m in length and 24.5m in width will support operations for RNZN through supplying fuel, food, water and ammunition.

    The ceremony held at HHI’s headquarter in Ulsan, Korea, was attended by Mr. Nam Sang-hoon, Senior Executive Vice President of HHI, Mr. Philip Turner, New Zealand Ambassador of Korea, and Major General Sung Il, Director General for International Cooperation of Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA).

    The Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN) deployed ROKS Daecheong (AOE-58) to the ceremony to wish for a safe voyage of Aotearoa.

    The departure is notable that Korea successfully exported logistics support vessel based on advanced technology to the country that sent warships to Korea during the Korean War.

    In addition, Korea and New Zealand have been building trust relations, with the Defense Acquisition Program Administration and the New Zealand Ministry of National Defense signing a “Defense Material Cooperation Arrangement” last year to expand cooperation in the defense sector between the two countries.

    At a launch ceremony this week, the Royal New Zealand Navy’s (RNZN) first purpose-built ship in 10 years, the HMNZS Aotearoa, finally found herself in her natural environment only eight months after her keel was laid in a South Korean shipyard, the RNZN press office announced on April 25.
    HMNZS Aotearoa on the water for the first time following her launch at the Hyundai Heavy Industries shipyard in Ulsan, South Korea (Credit: RNZN)
    “We are honored to have demonstrated our excellent naval ship design and construction capabilities by delivering HMNZS Aotearoa despite COVID-19.”
    Senior Executive Vice President of HHI Mr. Nam

    “We’d like to thank HHI for its efforts to ensure the successful delivery of the Royal New Zealand Navy’s largest-ever ship. The close cooperation between HHI and its subcontractors and New Zealand Ministry of Defence Project Team on the basis of mutual trust is what made the delivery of the ship possible. We expect the ship which is as versatile as its size will be able to carry out many activities, including disaster relief activities.”
    New Zealand Ambassador in Korea Mr. Philip

    Since the delivery of the first Korean-built frigate ROKS Ulsan in 1980, HHI has played a pivotal role in the modernization of ROK Navy designing major warships. And evidently it now expands its service to worldwide navies with advanced, affordable warships. HHI is now focusing its capabilities on the concept design of the LPX-II aircraft carrier, while also speeding up preparations for the Korean future destroyer KDDX project.

    TAGS HMNZS Aotearoa Hyundai Heavy Industries Logistic Support Ship
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  9. #157
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    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/300...s-from-vanuatu

    The Royal NZ Air Force has come to the rescue of more than 1000 seasonal workers who were desperate to get home to help rebuild their cyclone-devastated communities.

    The workers, here to pick fruit under the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme, had been unable to get home because of Covid-19 border restrictions in their home country.


    Again underlining the advantages of having a state owned strategic air mobility asset.

    Also attached is the Winter 2020 edition of NZ defence sector magazine Line of Defence.

    https://defsec.net.nz/2020/02/01/winter-2020/

    As an aside there has been some commentary with respect to transferring some excess Air New Zealand aircraft across to the RNZAF. Namely the ATR-72 which could be converted into a 2nd tier MPA asset to complement the P-8A as part of the Enhanced Maritime Awareness Capability project (The ATR-72MP is outlined in an article of the Line of Defence magazine page 16) and the Boeing 777-200ER (alongside the A330) of which 8 have been parked and will go into desert storage near Alice Springs. The Government of New Zealand is the majority owner of Air New Zealand and currently propping them up. There is a view in some quarters that baseline solutions for these projects are already part owned by the government and with the millions going daily from the taxpayer, Air NZ writing down the aircraft book value as part of its fiscal loss, then it makes sense for a transfer of some airframes across to the other government entity that flies aircraft - the RNZAF as compensation. The current B752 has been found to lack operational range and capacity in the vital Antartica resupply tasking as part of the Future Strategic Air Mobility Capability project which starts next year.

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  11. #158
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    How do they think a slow, short ranged turbo prop is going to complement a fast, long legged P-8, over the kind of distances the New Zealanders deal with? they'd either have to add an internal fuel tank or add the means to carry external tanks, apart from the weight of a sensor kit. It smells of dumping of unwanted aircraft.

  12. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
    How do they think a slow, short ranged turbo prop is going to complement a fast, long legged P-8, over the kind of distances the New Zealanders deal with? they'd either have to add an internal fuel tank or add the means to carry external tanks, apart from the weight of a sensor kit. It smells of dumping of unwanted aircraft.
    Maybe use the shorter legged aircraft for coastal work while the P8 is out at the extremities?
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  14. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
    How do they think a slow, short ranged turbo prop is going to complement a fast, long legged P-8, over the kind of distances the New Zealanders deal with? they'd either have to add an internal fuel tank or add the means to carry external tanks, apart from the weight of a sensor kit. It smells of dumping of unwanted aircraft.
    There has been a missing inshore requirement for many years since the three F-27 Friendships were not replaced due to government cost cutting. That is the complementary aspect . The P-8A's will do the long range stuff and also will be deployed as coalition ASW assets. The ATR-72 is already one of the competitors for the EMAC project requirement along with the CASA and the MQ-4B Sea Guardian. Thus the view by some commentators that Covid-19 enforced retired 5 year old aircraft like the ATR's could make for excellent donors thus saving taxpayer $$ and some. Obviously additional fuel capacity would be fitted in any ATR-72 to P-72A conversion.

  15. #161
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    the ATR does not have a background as a Maritime aircraft so anyone taking one on in that role will have lots of fun, being first on type in role. I'd rather get the long established Casa to fill a capability gap,instead of relearning how to rerole an aircraft.

  16. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
    the ATR does not have a background as a Maritime aircraft so anyone taking one on in that role will have lots of fun, being first on type in role. I'd rather get the long established Casa to fill a capability gap,instead of relearning how to rerole an aircraft.
    Haven't Italy and Turkey ordered the ATR-72 MP?
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    I mean, annihilation's bad enough without anarchy to make things even worse!

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  18. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by CTU View Post
    Haven't Italy and Turkey ordered the ATR-72 MP?
    I think the Nigerians have the ATR-42 in that role also? I'd imagine the MPA fit for the ATRs would be interchangeable like the 235/295?

  19. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoneToTheCanner View Post
    the ATR does not have a background as a Maritime aircraft so anyone taking one on in that role will have lots of fun, being first on type in role. I'd rather get the long established Casa to fill a capability gap,instead of relearning how to rerole an aircraft.
    It is not the ATR Group that offers the ATR as a MP, it is one of the partners Leonardo. If my memory is correct the AR was also a contender for our MPA.
    Leonardo has more competence in equipping an aircraft for MPA than Airbus (CASA) as it produces all mission systems and sensors needed.
    The ATR is a capable MPA and as pointed out is in service with Italy, Turkey and Pakistan. While this is less than the number of military operators of the C295, the total amount of ATR's in service is many times that.

  20. #165
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    The multirole sustainment vessel HMNZS Aotearoa has arrived at Devonport Naval base in Auckland following its delivery from the HHI shipyard in South Korea. The new vessel was greeted with a stirring Haka performed by the RNZN Maori Cultural Group, the HMNZS Manawanui, a flotilla of small vessels from the public and a C-130 and P-3K flyover.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...ture=emb_title

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/121...itemat-harbour

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  22. #166
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    https://www.flightglobal.com/rnzaf-c...139039.article

    Flight Global interview with RNZAF Air Vice-Marshal Andrew Clark about RNZAF platforms and acquisition plans.

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  24. #167
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    NZ Army adds 43 more Bushmaster Protected Mobility Vehicles to replace the 14 year old Pinzgauers.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/122...s-ageing-fleet

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  26. #168
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    They are also getting Tactical Golf Carts.
    https://www.janes.com/defence-news/n...-mrzr-vehicles



    These are a vehicle type that have really exploded onto the scene, both in Military and agriculture. They have created a class specially for them in the Dakar Rally also, somewhere between cars and quads.
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  27. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anzac View Post
    NZ Army adds 43 more Bushmaster Protected Mobility Vehicles to replace the 14 year old Pinzgauers.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/122...s-ageing-fleet
    Surprised they went with the old model and not the newer MR6 variant.
    Does this mean they are likely to offer even more NZLAVs for disposal than the 30 already on offer?

  28. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by EUFighter View Post
    Surprised they went with the old model and not the newer MR6 variant.
    Does this mean they are likely to offer even more NZLAVs for disposal than the 30 already on offer?
    Is there much difference between the 5.5 and the Mk6?
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  29. #171
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    Not knowing what is inside the vehicle is a bit difficult to tell. The MR6 has GVA compliant backbone to allow for easier system integration.
    The main visible difference is that the driver and co get their own doors to enter/exit the vehicle.

    https://www.army-technology.com/proj...oured-vehicle/

  30. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by EUFighter View Post
    Not knowing what is inside the vehicle is a bit difficult to tell. The MR6 has GVA compliant backbone to allow for easier system integration.
    The main visible difference is that the driver and co get their own doors to enter/exit the vehicle.

    https://www.army-technology.com/proj...oured-vehicle/
    Commonality with the versions already in use by NZ SAS perhaps?
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  31. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by EUFighter View Post
    Surprised they went with the old model and not the newer MR6 variant.
    Does this mean they are likely to offer even more NZLAVs for disposal than the 30 already on offer?
    It is the NZ5.5 variant which essentially is the MR6. In the photo op are the older Bushies used by E Squadron. Everyone is pleased to see the back of the Pinzer, which was never wanted, in fact hated. The preference all those years ago was the Bushies - but they bought so many LAV's they had to get the el-cheapo Pinzer. At least they had 60 of them beacuse they were so fragile and unreliable at least there were enough. But the Ministry of Defence around 15 years ago was arrogant and disfunctional and made a pigs breakfast of everything they touched and never listened to what the customer was telling them.

    No they will stay at 75 LAV's for now with a replacement in around 10 years, likely to be the Boxer is the word around the campfire. Those excess 30 were money down the drain and hardly ever moved.

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  33. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anzac View Post
    It is the NZ5.5 variant which essentially is the MR6. In the photo op are the older Bushies used by E Squadron. Everyone is pleased to see the back of the Pinzer, which was never wanted, in fact hated. The preference all those years ago was the Bushies - but they bought so many LAV's they had to get the el-cheapo Pinzer. At least they had 60 of them beacuse they were so fragile and unreliable at least there were enough. But the Ministry of Defence around 15 years ago was arrogant and disfunctional and made a pigs breakfast of everything they touched and never listened to what the customer was telling them.

    No they will stay at 75 LAV's for now with a replacement in around 10 years, likely to be the Boxer is the word around the campfire. Those excess 30 were money down the drain and hardly ever moved.
    Sounds Familiar. The same MOD who decided you didn't need to replace the Skyhawks or Aermacchis? The same MOD who decided you didn't need to get C130J and a SLEP on the C130H would be better?
    Sounds very familiar.
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  35. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anzac View Post
    It is the NZ5.5 variant which essentially is the MR6. In the photo op are the older Bushies used by E Squadron. Everyone is pleased to see the back of the Pinzer, which was never wanted, in fact hated. The preference all those years ago was the Bushies - but they bought so many LAV's they had to get the el-cheapo Pinzer. At least they had 60 of them beacuse they were so fragile and unreliable at least there were enough. But the Ministry of Defence around 15 years ago was arrogant and disfunctional and made a pigs breakfast of everything they touched and never listened to what the customer was telling them.

    No they will stay at 75 LAV's for now with a replacement in around 10 years, likely to be the Boxer is the word around the campfire. Those excess 30 were money down the drain and hardly ever moved.
    How much are they looking for to get rid of the NZLAS's?

    It was interesting that Argentina went for new Stryker vehicles rather than snap the NZLAVs especially given their financial situation.

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