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  1. #26
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    In a major development for Australia’s $35 billion Hunter Class frigate program, an interim contract has been struck between the Commonwealth and BAE Systems Australia.
    https://www.defenceconnect.com.au/ma...class-frigates
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  3. #27
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    http://www.defence.gov.au/casg/Multi...eet-9-9243.pdf

    Here is the RAN's recently released Fact Sheet for the new Hunter Class Frigates.

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  5. #28
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    The EC-135T2 is the new joint training helicopter for the ADF

    http://www.navy.gov.au/aircraft/ec-135t2

    The three leased RAN Bell 429's flew their last flight a couple of weeks ago at the Avalon Air Show and are heading across the Tasman to the Auckland Police Air Support Unit replacing their two AS355 Ecureuil 2.

    https://navaltoday.com/2019/02/28/au...29-helicopter/

    https://www.helis.com/database/news/nz-police-bell-429/

    The Auckland Rescue Helicopter has also bought two AW-169's

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/a...ectid=12199755
    Last edited by Anzac; 19th March 2019 at 12:16.

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  7. #29
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    AUSTAL Australia Awarded A$324 Million Contract To Build Six Cape Class Patrol Boats

    https://euro-sd.com/2020/05/news/171...s-patrol-boat/



    Jack Richardson
    Austal Australia has been awarded a A$324 million contract to design and construct six evolved CAPE class Patrol Boats (CCPBs) for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The six new vessels, to be constructed at Austal’s Henderson shipyard in Western Australia, will add to the RAN’s existing fleet of two CCPB’s delivered in 2017, meaning this announcement extends Austal’s CCPB programme to a total of 18 vessels, including eight patrol boats operated by the Australian Border Force (ABF) and two currently under construction for the Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard.
    Austal’s Chief Executive David Singleton said of the new contract, which is the largest for an Australian vessel construction programme ever awarded to Austal in the Company’s 30 year history, reaffirmed the CAPE class as Australia’s pre-eminent patrol boat platform and represented a clear commitment by the Australian Government to strengthen Australia’s sovereign shipbuilding industry during a challenging global environment brought on by the Coronavirus pandemic.
    “Since its introduction by the Australian Border Force (ABF) in 2013, the CAPE class has proven to be a high-performing, reliable and effective maritime asset, utilised for a wide variety of constabulary and naval missions, playing a critical role in Australia’s national security,” Mr Singleton said. “With ten CAPES currently in operation with the ABF and RAN, it is a smart, logical step to build upon the existing fleet with additional vessels that will enhance the nation’s ability to protect and secure our maritime borders,” he added.
    Crew capacity has been increased by 10 people to 32, and quality-of-life provisions have been enhanced, ensuring those who operate the new Capes have connectivity to the outside world, regardless of the operating environment. Further improvements have been incorporated into the new vessels, developed during the design and construction of two CCPBs for the Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard. This was an export contract awarded on 16th August 2019 and won with the strong support of the Australian Government and Export Finance Australia, with the vessels currently in an advanced state of construction and scheduled for delivery later in 2020.
    Construction of the six CAPES for the RAN will commence immediately at Austal’s shipyard in Henderson, Western Australia, with deliveries scheduled from September 2021, then successively through to mid-2023. Austal has designed, constructed and sustained the Commonwealth of Australia’s entire fleet of patrol boats since 1998; including the BAY, ARMIDALE and CAPE class operated by the RAN and ABF, comprising 32 vessels.

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  9. #30
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    Royal Australian Navy First Offshore Patrol Vessel Arafura coming together.
    The Morrison Government’s Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) program has reached another milestone with the two halves of the first Arafura Class OPV coming together to form a complete hull.

    In a further milestone for the Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) program, the two halves of the first of class ship, Arafura, built by Luerssen Australia and its partner ASC have been brought together and welded to form a complete hull. It marks the largest industrial manoeuvre at Osborne Naval Shipyard in South Australia.
    Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds CSC said the Australian Naval Infrastructure (ANI) operations team manoeuvred the two mega-blocks of the ship together, weighing 1,000 tonnes in total, with only millimetres between them.

    The first of the OPVs, Arafura, is planned to enter service from the early 2020’s and will conduct border protection and maritime patrol missions alongside other Australian and regional partners.
    “The OPV program is delivering benefits across Australia, with the first two vessels under construction at Osborne in South Australia and the remaining 10 vessels to be built at Henderson in Western Australia.”

    The program of 12 vessels will replace and improve upon the capability delivered by the Armidale Class and Cape Class Patrol Boats.




    https://www.navyrecognition.com/inde...-together.html
    Last edited by na grohmiti; 6th May 2020 at 15:35.
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  11. #31
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    Poor reporting on Naval Recognition, especially as the RAN had just ordered 6 new Cape class patrol vessels!

    At the moment it seems that they replace the 13 Armidale patrol boats (300t) with 12 Arafura OPVs (1640t) which is one hell of a jump up.
    What is still not clear is the Huom MCM replacement; will there still be three additional ships or will there be in the future a " deployable mine counter measure capability"?

  12. #32
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    What isn't clear to me also is, are the new Cape class for the navy, or for the border force to be operated by the RAN?
    My understanding is a single opv class will replace Huon and Armidale class, in addition to the Paluma class survey launches.
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  13. #33
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    More footage of the OPV hull pairing.
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  15. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by na grohmiti View Post
    What isn't clear to me also is, are the new Cape class for the navy, or for the border force to be operated by the RAN?
    My understanding is a single opv class will replace Huon and Armidale class, in addition to the Paluma class survey launches.
    Good question, the first two vessels are leased and are non-commissioned vessels having the prefix Australian Defence Vessel rather than HMAS.... They also retain the paint scheme from the Australian Border Force.

    It looks like the new vessels will be navy vessels, they are enhanced over the older vessels, apparently they are to fill a gap with the new OPV's, that of inshore patrol. They were worried that the draught of the new ship is too restrictive hence the order for the Cape-class. Just out of interest each Cape will be A$54m or 32mEuro.


    I think the Australians will wait until they have a modular deployable MCM before they retire the Huon class, it is not as if the hulls have a short life.
    Last edited by EUFighter; 7th May 2020 at 11:26.

  16. #35
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  18. #36
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    Whats the story with the Keel on ships that have their hull sections built and joined in the above manner. My understanding is that the keel running the length of the hull gives it it's strength. Are the joins now stress raisers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sofa View Post
    Whats the story with the Keel on ships that have their hull sections built and joined in the above manner. My understanding is that the keel running the length of the hull gives it it's strength. Are the joins now stress raisers.
    Ships are today built in sections (modules) and joined together. Although the old building technique of first laying down the "keel" is no longer the standard for large vessels that is not to say ships do not have keel. Today depending on the ship there are a number of different type of keels, "flat plate", "bar" etc. More detail can be found in the link:
    https://www.slideshare.net/MarineStu...structure-part

    As for "stress raiser", the quick answer is no. There was never on a large ship a single piece of material going from bow to stern, keels have always been made-up of smaller parts, originally riveted and today welded. The joining with welding is now a well understood and does not have any of the early issue which people bring up eg "Liberty ships". Structurally the joint is no different from any other structural joint in the ship as a whole or a module.
    Last edited by EUFighter; 8th May 2020 at 13:04.

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  21. #38
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    Our own more recent six OPVs were all built as superblocks, before being joined together on the floor of the Drydock.
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